The Supreme Judicial Court of the State of Maine, 1820 to 2009


The following list of the 108 Justices of the Court in chronological order provides their residence at appointment, the date of appointment, when and if they were appointed Chief Justice, their last day in office and why, and the citation to any memorial service. Following the chronological list, in alphabetical order, are brief biographies of the 106 Justices, as well as a photograph, prepared with the assistance of Jason P. Donovan, my current law clerk, when he was a volunteer intern in my chambers during the summer of 2005.

Howard H. Dana, Jr. Associate Justice December, 2006





NumberNameResidenceDate of AppointmentLast Day in OfficeMemorial Service CitationFull Biography
1Prentiss MellenPortlandChief Justice, 7/1/182010/11/1834 (resigned)17 ME 467
2William Pitt PreblePortlandAssociate Justice, 7/1/18206/18/1828 (resigned)
3Nathan Weston, Jr.AugustaAssociate Justice, 7/1/1820 to 1834, Chief Justice 10/22/183410/22/1841 (retired)33 ME 593
4Albion K. ParrisPortlandAssociate Justice, 6/25/18288/20/1836 (resigned)
5Nicholas EmeryPortlandAssociate Justice, 10/22/183410/22/1841 (commission expired)
6Ether ShepleySacoAssociate Justice, 9/23/1836; Chief Justice 10/23/1848 10/22/1855 (retired)66 ME 593
7John S. TenneyNorridgewockAssociate Justice 1841-1855; Chief Justice 10/22/185510/23/1862 (retired)56 ME 583
8Ezekiel WhitmanPortlandChief Justice 10/10/184110/23/1848 (retired)
9Samuel WellsPortlandAssociate Justice 9/28/18473/31/1854 (resigned)
10Joseph HowardPortlandAssociate Justice 10/23/184810/22/1855 (commission expired)67 ME 600
11Richard D. RiceAugustaAssociate Justice 5/11/185212/1/1863 (resigned)
12John AppletonBangorAssociate Justice 5/11/1852; Chief Justice 10/24/1862 9/20/1883 (retired)83 ME 587
13Joshua W. HathawayBangorAssociate Justice 5/11/18525/11/1859 (commission expired)48 ME 599
14Jonas CuttingBangorAssociate Justice 4/20/18544/20/1875 (retired)65 ME 599
15Seth MayWinthropAssociate Justice 5/6/18555/6/1862(retired)74 ME 601
16Woodbury DavisPortlandAssociate Justice 10/10/1855, reappointed 2/25/18575/6/1856(removed by address); 1865 (resigned)
17Daniel GoodenowAlfredAssociate Justice 10/10/185510/10/1862 (retired)50 ME 610
18Edward KentBangorAssociate Justice 5/11/18595/11/1873 (retired)68 ME 602
19Charles W. WaltonAuburnAssociate Justice 5/14/18625/14/1897 (retired)90 ME 603; 94 ME 588
20Jonathan G. DickersonBelfastAssociate Justice 10/24/18629/1/1878 (died)68 ME 595
21Edward FoxPortlandAssociate Justice 10/24/18623/27/1863 (resigned)
22William G. BarrowsBrunswickAssociate Justice 3/27/18633/24/1884 (retired)78 ME 584
23Charles DanforthGardinerAssociate Justice 1/5/18643/30/1890 (died)83 ME 582
24Rufus P. TapleySacoAssociate Justice 12/12/186512/21/1872 (retired)85 ME 579
25William Wirt VirginPortlandAssociate Justice 12/26/18721/23/1893 (died)85 ME 549
26John A. PetersBangorAssociate Justice 12/26/1873; Chief Justice 9/20/18831/1/1890 (retired)93 ME 604; 99 ME 541
27Artemas LibbyAugustaAssociate Justice 4/23/1875 and 1/1/18834/23/1882 and 3/15/1894 (died)86 ME 584
28Joseph W. SymondsPortlandAssociate Justice 10/16/18783/31/1884 (resigned)118 ME 581
29Lucilius A. EmeryEllsworthAssociate Justice 10/5/1883; Chief Justice 12/14/19067/26/1911 (retired)101 ME 599; 120 ME 575; 107 ME 569
30Enoch FosterBethelAssociate Justice 3/24/18843/24/1898 (commission expired)112 ME 565
31Thomas H. HaskellPortlandAssociate Justice 3/31/18849/24/1900 (died)94 ME 617; 95 ME 590
32William Penn WhitehouseAugustaAssociate Justice 4/15/1890; Chief Justice 7/26/19114/8/1913 (retired)122 ME 575; 107 ME 570
33Andrew WiswellEllsworthAssociate Justice 4/10/1893; Chief Justice 1/2/190012/4/1906 (died)101 ME 599; 103 ME 579; 93 ME 606
34Sewall C. StroutPortlandAssociate Justice 4/12/189412/12/1908 (retired)113 ME 575; 103 ME 579
35Albert R. SavageAuburnAssociate Justice 5/15/1897; Chief Justice 4/9/19136/14/1917 (died)90 ME 604; 116 ME 533
36William H. FoglerRocklandAssociate Justice 3/25/18982/18/1902 (died)96 ME 577
37Frederick A. PowersHoultonAssociate Justice 1/2/19003/31/1907 (resigned)93 ME 606; 122 ME 597; 102 ME 572
38Henry C. PeabodyPortlandAssociate Justice 11/29/19003/29/1911 (died)107 ME 549, 569; 94 ME 617
39Albert M. SpearGardinerAssociate Justice 3/1/1902; Re=appointed 6/25/19173/1/16 (appointment expired); 7/7/1923 (retired); Active Retired 1923-1929128 ME 551
40Charles F. WoodardBangorAssociate Justice 12/14/19066/17/1907 (died)101 ME 599; 102 ME 572; 103 ME 559
41Leslie C. CornishAugustaAssociate Justice 3/31/1907; Chief Justice 6/25/19173/1/1925 (retired)102 ME 572; 125 ME 543
42Arno W. KingEllsworthAssociate Justice 6/28/19077/21/1918 (died)102 ME 572; 118 ME 561
43George E. BirdPortlandAssociate Justice 4/13/19088/28/1918 (retired)125 ME 571; 103 ME 570
44George F. HaleyBiddefordAssociate Justice 4/12/19112/19/1918 (died)107 ME 569; 117 ME 585
45George M. HansonCalaisAssociate Justice 7/26/19114/4/1924 (retired)124 ME 517; 117 ME 585
46Warren C. PhilbrookWatervilleAssociate Justice 4/9/191311/29/1928 (retired)132 ME 529
47John B. MadiganHoultonAssociate Justice 3/2/190611/29/1928 (died)117 ME 597
48Charles J. Dunn, Jr.OronoAssociate Justice 1/28/1918; Chief Justice 7/18/193511/10/1939 (died)137 ME 363
49John A. MorrillAuburnAssociate Justice 2/25/19185/31/1926 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1926-1933142 ME 425
50Scott WilsonPortlandAssociate Justice 8/17/1918; Chief Justice 3/1/192510/7/1930 (retired)140 ME 367
51Luere B. DeasyBar HarborAssociate Justice 9/25/1918; Chief Justice 10/12/19292/7/1930 (retired)138 ME 371
52Guy H. SturgisPortlandAssociate Justice 8/14/1923; Chief Justice 8/8/19403/1/1949 (retired)146 ME 461
53Charles P. BarnesHoultonAssociate Justice 4/17/1924; Chief Justice 11/21/19297/31/1940 (retired)149 ME 439
54Norman L. BassettAugustaAssociate Justice 3/26/19259/15/1930 (retired)130 ME 541
55William R. PattangallAugustaAssociate Justice 7/2/1926; Chief Justice 2/7/19307/16/1935 (retired)140 ME 329
56Frank G. FarringtonAugustaAssociate Justice 11/16/19289/3/1933 (died)132 ME 545
57Sidney St. Felix ThaxterPortlandAssociate Justice 9/16/19302/28/1954 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1954-1958154 ME 411
58James H. HudsonGuilfordAssociate Justice 11/20/19338/21/1947 (died)
59Harry ManserAuburnAssociate Justice 7/18/19353/20/1946 (retired)152 ME 483
60George H. WorsterBangorAssociate Justice 12/21/19397/31/1942 (retired)
61Harold H. MurchieCalaisAssociate Justice 8/8/1940; Chief Justice 3/3/19493/7/1953 (died)
62Arthur ChapmanPortlandAssociate Justice 11/4/19428/5/1945 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1945-1952155 ME 444
63Nathaniel TompkinsHoultonAssociate Justice 8/23/19454/22/1949 (died)149 ME 439
64Raymond FellowsBangorAssociate Justice 5/1/1946; Chief Justice 4/7/19549/15/1956 (retired)153 ME 522
65Edward P. MurrayBangorAssociate Justice 9/18/19474/6/1948 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1948-1962
66Edward F. MerrillSkowheganAssociate Justice 6/2/1948; Chief Justice 3/18/19534/7/1954 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1948-1962158 ME 513
67William B. NultyPortlandAssociate Justice 3/16/19499/11/1953 (died)152 ME 479; 152 ME 549
68Robert B. WilliamsonAugustaAssociate Justice 5/5/1949; Chief Justice 10/4/19568/21/1970 (retired)367-375 ME Rep. 5
69Frank A. Tirrell, Jr.CamdenAssociate Justice 3/18/19536/4/1955 (died)152 ME 469
70Donald W. WebberAuburnAssociate Justice 10/8/19537/31/1973 (retired)699-709 Me Rep. XXXVII
71Albert BeliveauRumfordAssociate Justice 3/3/19543/25/1958 (retired)293-299 Me Rep.
72Walter M. Tapley, Jr.PortlandAssociate Justice 5/5/19546/30/1969 (retired)293-299 Me Rep.
73Percy T. ClarkeEllsworthAssociate Justice 6/29/19556/7/56 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1956-1957154 ME 396
74F. Harold DubordWatervilleAssociate Justice 10/4/195612/10/1962 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1956-1957161 ME 670
75Francis W. SullivanPortlandAssociate Justice 10/4/19567/10/1965 (retired)237-248 Me Rep.
76Cecil J. SiddallSanfordAssociate Justice 5/7/19582/27/1965 (retired)522-536 Me Rep.
77Harold C. MardenWatervilleAssociate Justice 12/19/196211/15/1970 (retired)692-698 Me Rep.
78Abraham M. RudmanBangorAssociate Justice 3/30/196512/14/1966 (retired)692-698 Me Rep.
79Armand A. Dufresne, Jr.LewistonAssociate Justice 8/24/1965; Chief Justice 9/30/1970; Active Retired 9/16/19779/3/1977 (retired); 3/16/1985 (ended active retired status)699-709 Me Rep.
80Randolph A. WeatherbeeBangorAssociate Justice 12/21/19665/20/1976 (died)360-366 Me Rep.
81Charles A. PomeroyWindhamAssociate Justice 7/21/19691/1/1980 (retired)692-698 Me Rep.
82Sidney W. WernickPortlandAssociate Justice 9/30/19701/1/1981 (retired); Active Retired 9/22/1995 (died)699-709 Me Rep.
83James P. ArchibaldHoultonAssociate Justice 1/27/19711/1/80 (retired); Active Retired 10/24/1981 - 5/28/2006 (died)699-709 Me Rep.
84Thomas E. DelahantyLewistonAssociate Justice 9/5/19738/31/1983 (retired); Active Retired Justice 1979-1985488-497 Me Rep.
85Edward S. GodfreyPortlandAssociate Justice 8/18/19769/1/1983 (retired)
86David A. NicholsLincolnvilleAssociate Justice 5/23/19775/31/1988 (retired)
87Vincent L. McKusickCape ElizabethChief Justice 9/16/19772/28/1992 (retired)
88Harry P. GlassmanPortlandAssociate Justice 8/31/19795/15/1981 (died)Me. Rep. 441-448
89David G. RobertsBangorAssociate Justice 1/11/19808/31/98 (retired); Active Retired 9/2/1998 to 1/26/1999 (died)
90Gene CarterBangorAssociate Justice 9/15/19807/5/1983(resigned)
91Elmer H. VioletteVan BurenAssociate Justice 8/31/19818/1/1986; Active Retired 8/1/1986-2/1/1994
92Daniel WathenAugustaAssociate Justice 8/31/1981; Chief Justice 3/20/199210/4/2001 (resigned to run for Governor)
93Caroline Duby GlassmanPortlandAssociate Justice 8/30/19838/29/1997 (retired)
94Louis ScolnikLewistonAssociate Justice 9/7/19838/1/1988 (retired)
95Robert W. CliffordLewistonAssociate Justice 8/1/1986 8/31/09 (retired) Active Retired 9/1/09
 
96D. Brock HornbyCape ElizabethAssociate Justice 6/10/19885/7/1990 (resigned)
97Samuel W. Collins, Jr.RocklandAssociate Justice 9/16/19884/15/1994 (retired); Active Retired 5/12/1994 to present
98Morton A. BrodyWatervilleAssociate Justice 6/6/19908/8/1991 (resigned)
99Paul L. RudmanBangorAssociate Justice 6/5/19927/1/2005 (retired)
100Howard H. Dana, Jr.Cape ElizabethAssociate Justice 3/4/19933/2/2007 (retired)
101Kermit V. LipezSo. PortlandAssociate Justice 5/12/19946/30/1998 (resigned)
102Leigh I. SaufleyPortlandAssociate Justice 10/20/1997Chief Justice 12/6/2001 to present
103Donald G. AlexanderWinthropAssociate Justice 9/2/1998present
104Susan CalkinsPortlandAssociate Justice 9/2/1998to 10/1/07 (retired)
105Jon D. LevyPortlandAssociate Justice 3/7/2002 to May 5, 2014 (resigned)
106Warren M. SilverBangorAssociate Justice 7/29/2005present
107Andrew M. MeadBangorAssociate Justice 3/22/2007 present
108Ellen A. GormanFalmouthAssociate Justice 10/1/2007 present
109Joseph M. JabarWatervilleAssociate Justice 9/1/2009 present




(1) Prentiss Mellen
Chief Justice 1820-1834


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Prentiss Mellen was born on October 11, 1764 in Sterling, Massachusetts to Rev. John Mellen and Rebecca Prentiss Mellen. He graduated from Harvard College in 1784. After college, he spent a year as a private tutor in Barnstable, Massachusetts and read law under the tutelage of Shearjashub Bourne. Mellen was admitted to the bar in Taunton, Massachusetts in 1788.

Mellen moved to Biddeford (in what later would be Maine) in 1792 and then to Portland in 1806. In 1818, he was elected to the United States Senate from Massachusetts to fill the vacancy left by the death of Eli P. Ashmun. However, he served for less than two years, resigning in 1820 upon the admission of the State of Maine into the United States.

On July 1, 1820, Mellen was appointed the first Chief Justice of the Maine Supreme Judicial Court. He served as Chief until October 11, 1834, when at the age of 70 he was constitutionally disqualified from the bench and forced to resign. Mellen died in Portland on December 31, 1840, at the age of 76.





Sources: In Memoriam Prentiss Mellen, 17 ME 467; William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey and Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 163-173; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (www.bioguide.congress.gov/ scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=M000636).





(2) William Pitt Preble
Associate Justice 1820-1828


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William Pitt Preble was born on November 27, 1783 in York. His father was Esaias Preble. He graduated from Harvard College in 1806. After reading law under the tutelage of Benjamin Hasey of Topsham, Preble was appointed County Attorney for York in 1811.

Preble was appointed the United States Attorney for the District of Maine by President Madison on 1814 and served until 1820. He moved to Portland and was the city’s representative to Maine’s 1819 Constitutional Convention. Preble was appointed one of the inaugural Associate Justices of the Supreme Judicial Court on July 1, 1820 when the State of Maine was admitted into the Union. He served on the Court until his resignation on June 18, 1828.

In 1828, President Jackson appointed Preble Minister to The Hague to represent the United States in its dispute with Great Britain over the Northeastern boundary, which was ultimately settled by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty of 1842. Preble was named the first president of the Atlantic and St. Lawrence Railroad Company in 1847. He died on October 11, 1857, at the age of 73.




Sources: William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 597-614; Virtual American Biographies (http://www.famousamericans.net/williampittpreble/).





(3) Nathan Weston, Jr.
Associate Justice 1820-1834, Chief Justice 1834-1841


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Nathan Weston was born on July 27, 1782 in Hallowell (part of present day Augusta) to Nathan and Elizabeth (Bancroft) Weston. He was educated at Hallowell Academy, and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1803. He read law in the offices of Benjamin Whitwell in Augusta, and George Blake in Boston, Massachusetts. He was admitted to the Suffolk County, Massachusetts Bar in July 1806, and soon after returned to Augusta to open his practice.

Weston served as New Gloucester’s representative to the Massachusetts Legislature in 1808. He also served as a delegate to the Brunswick Convention of 1816, which addressed the issue of statehood for Maine. With the restructuring of the Massachusetts court system in 1811, Weston was appointed by Governor Strong as Chief Justice of the Second Eastern Circuit Court for the District of Maine. At the time of his appointment, Weston was 29 years old.

Weston was appointed an Associate Justice of the first Maine Supreme Judicial Court by Governor William King on July 1, 1820, upon the admission of the State of Maine into the Union and was appointed Chief Justice on October 22, 1834. He served as Chief until his retirement on October 22, 1841. Weston died in Augusta on June 4, 1872, at the age of 90. His grandson, Melville Weston Fuller, was Chief Justice of the United States.




Sources: In Memoriam Nathan Weston, Jr., 33 ME 593; Willis, Lawyers and Courts of Maine (1863).





(4) Albion K. Parris
Associate Justice 1828-1836


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Albion K. Parris was born on January 19, 1788 in Hebron to Samuel and Sarah (Pratt) Parris. He was educated locally before graduating from Dartmouth College in 1806. Parris read law with the future Chief Justice Ezekial Whitman, first in New Gloucester, then in Portland. He was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1809, but immediately established his office in Paris, Oxford County.

In 1811, Parris was appointed County Attorney for Oxford; in 1813 he was elected to the General Court in Massachusetts; and was elected to the United States House of Representatives in 1815. He served in Congress until February 1818 when he was appointed Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maine by President Monroe. He sat on the District Court until 1820.

Parris was a staunch supporter of Maine’s separation from Massachusetts. He was the Treasurer of the Maine Constitutional Convention. Following Maine’s statehood in 1820, Parris was appointed the Probate Judge of Cumberland County by Governor King. Parris himself was elected Governor of Maine and held that office from 1822 until 1827. Afterward, he was elected to the United States Senate, replacing John Holmes, and served from 1827 until 1828.

Parris was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Lincoln on June 25, 1828, and served until his resignation on August 20, 1836. He served as Second Comptroller of the United States Treasury from 1836 until 1850. He was elected Mayor of Portland in 1852 and waged an unsuccessful campaign for Governor in 1854. He died on February 11, 1857, at the age of 69.




Sources: William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 565-572; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=P000079).





(5) Nicholas Emery
Associate Justice 1834-1841


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Nicholas Emery was born on September 4, 1776 in Exeter, New Hampshire to Noah and Jane (Hale) Emery. He was educated at Exeter Academy, and graduated from Dartmouth College at the age of nineteen. After college, Emery prepared for a legal career by reading law in Portsmouth, New Hampshire.

Emery returned to Exeter Academy as an assistant instructor in 1797, and was later admitted to the York County Bar in 1798. Emery began his legal practice in Parsonsfield but moved to Portland in 1807. Emery was an active participant in the debate over the separation of the District of Maine from the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, serving on the Brunswick Convention of 1816. He also served as a delegate from Portland to the convention that drafted the Maine Constitution.

Emery was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Dunlap on October 22, 1834. Emery served on the Court until October 21, 1841. He died on August 24, 1861, at the age of 85.




Sources: William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 262-269





(6) Ether Shepley
Associate Justice 1836-1848; Chief Justice 1848-1855


001

Ether Shepley was born on November 2, 1789 in Groton, Massachusetts to John and Mary (Thurlow) Shepley. He was educated at Groton Academy and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1811. He read law in the offices of Dudley Hubbard in South Berwick, and Solomon Strong of Hampshire. He was admitted to the bar in 1814, and began his practice in Saco.

Shepley became a member of the Massachusetts General Court in 1819. In 1820, he was selected as a delegate for the Maine State Constitutional Convention. From 1820 until 1833, Shepley served as a United States Attorney for the District of Maine. In 1833, he was elected a United States Senator for Maine, succeeding John Holmes, and served until his resignation in 1836.

Shepley was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Dunlap on September 23, 1836. On October 23, 1848 Governor Dana appointed him Chief Justice, where he served until his retirement on October 22, 1855. Shepley was the father of George F. Shepley who, like his father, served as United States Attorney for the District of Maine, but who declined appointment to the Supreme Judicial Court. Ether Shepley died in Portland on January 15, 1877, at 87.






Sources: In Memoriam Ether Shepley, 66 ME 593; William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 619-626; Virtual American Biographies (http://www.famousamericans.net/johnshepley/); Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/ biodisplay.pl?index=S000334)





(7) John S. Tenney
Associate Justice 1841-1855; Chief Justice 1855-1862


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John S. Tenney was born on January 21, 1793 in Rowley (now Byefield), Massachusetts. He was educated in the local schools and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1816. After college, he taught briefly at Warren Academy. He soon moved to Hallowell and read law in the office of Attorney Bond.

Tenney was admitted to the bar in 1820. He maintained a private practice in law and in the fall of 1837 was elected to the House of Representatives.

Tenney was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Kent on October 23, 1841. He was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Morrill on October 23, 1855. He served as Chief until his retirement on October 23, 1862. Tenney then returned to state politics, being elected to the Senate in both 1863 and 1864. Tenney died in Norridgewock on August 23, 1869, at the age of 75.




Sources: In Memoriam John S. Tenney, 56 ME 583.





(8) Ezekiel Whitman
Chief Justice 1841-1848


001


Ezekiel Whitman was born on March 9, 1776 in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts to Josiah and Sarah (Sturtevant) Whitman. He graduated from Brown University in 1795. He read law and was admitted to the bar in Plymouth County, Massachusetts in 1799. He began his practice in New Gloucester and moved to Portland in 1807.

Whitman served in the United States Congress as a Federalist Representative from Massachusetts from 1809 until 1811, and again from 1817 until 1821. He was a delegate to the Maine State Constitutional Convention. He returned to Congress as a Representative from Maine from 1821 until 1822.

Whitman resigned from Congress to accept an appointment by Governor Parris as Chief Justice of the Maine Court of Common Pleas, where he served from 1822 until 1841. Following his appointment by Governor Kent, Whitman served as the third Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court from December 10, 1841, until his retirement on October 23, 1848. Whitman died in East Bridgewater, Massachusetts on August 1, 1866, at the age of 90.




Sources: William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 289-314; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=W000421).





(9) Samuel Wells
Associate Justice 1847-1854


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Samuel Wells was born on August 15, 1801 in Durham, New Hampshire. He studied law in the offices of Theodore Rice of Winslow and began his practice of law in Waterville in 1826; subsequently moved to Hallowell in 1835; and eventually settled in Portland in 1844. He served as Hallowell’s representative to the Maine State Legislature from 1836 until 1838.

Wells was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Dana on September 28, 1847. He resigned from the Court on March 31, 1854. A staunch Democrat, Wells was elected Governor of Maine in 1856. He was nominated for Governor by the Democratic party again for the term beginning in 1857, however, he lost the election due to discord in the Democratic party over the question of slavery. Wells was the last Democratic Governor of Maine for over twenty years.

Later in life, he left Maine and settled in Boston, Massachusetts. Wells died on July 15, 1868, at the age of 66. .




Sources: Henry Chase, Representative Men of Maine, The Lakeside Press, Portland, Maine, 1893 (found at http://history.rays-place.com/governors/me/wells+same.htm).





(10) Joseph Howard
Associate Justice 1848-1855


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Joseph Howard was born on March 14, 1800 in Brownfield. He was educated at Fryeburg Academy and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1821. He read law at the offices of Judge Dana and future Supreme Judicial Court Justice Daniel Goodenow and was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1824.

Howard opened an office in Bridgton but later moved to Limerick where he maintained a successful practice for more than a decade serving as York County attorney. In 1837, he moved to Portland when he was named United States District Attorney for Maine by President Van Buren. He held that office until 1841 when he returned to private practice.

Howard was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Dana on October 23, 1848. He served in that capacity until his commission expired on October 22, 1855. For a time he practiced law with future Supreme Judicial Court Justice Sewall C. Strout, and then with Nathan Cleaves, his son-in-law. He was elected Mayor of Portland in 1860, and campaigned unsuccessfully as the Democratic candidate for Governor in both 1864 and 1865. He died in Brownfield on December 12, 1877, at the age of 77.




Sources: In Memoriam Joseph Howard, 67 ME 600.





(11) Richard D. Rice
Associate Justice 1852-1863


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Richard Drury Rice was born on April 10, 1810 in Union. His father was the Hon. Nathan D. Rice. After an early career in the printing and publishing business, he read law in the Augusta office of the Hon. James W. Bradbury, United States Senator from Maine. After being admitted to the Kennebec County Bar in 1840, he practiced law with Senator Bradbury.

In 1848 he was appointed a Judge of the District Court for the Middle District by Governor Dana. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hubbard on May 11, 1852. He served on the Court until December 1, 1863 when he resigned to take the presidency of the Portland and Kennebec Railroad Company. He died at his home in Augusta on May 27, 1882, at the age of 72.








(12) John Appleton
Associate Justice 1852-1862, Chief Justice 1862-1883


001


John Appleton was born on July 12, 1804 in Ipswich, New Hampshire to John and Elizabeth (Peabody) Appleton. At the age of fourteen, Appleton traveled to Maine to study under the tutelage of his uncle, Jesse Appleton, President of Bowdoin College. After graduating from Bowdoin in 1822, Appleton read law first in Groton, Massachusetts, then in Alfred, Maine. Appleton was admitted to the Bar in Amherst, New Hampshire in 1826. Appleton settled in Bangor in 1832.

Appleton was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hubbard on May 11, 1852. On October 24, 1862, Appleton was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Washburn. He served as Chief until his retirement on September 20, 1883. His 21-year tenure as Chief was the longest of any Chief Justice. Appleton was the first Maine Supreme Judicial Court Justice to hold office from Piscataquis County.

Appleton died in Bangor, Maine at the age of 86 on February 7, 1891.




Sources: In Memoriam John Appleton, 83 ME 587; Maine State Law and Legislative Reference Library (http://www.state.me.us/legis/lawlib/portraits.htm); Virtual American Biographies (http://www.famousamericans.net/johnappleton1/).





(13) Joshua W. Hathaway
Associate Justice 1852-1859


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Joshua W. Hathaway was born on November 10, 1797 in New Brunswick to Joshua Warren and Mary Ann (Hathaway) Hathaway. He entered Dartmouth College in 1816, but graduated from Bowdoin College in 1820. After college, he read law and was admitted to the bar in 1824. He opened a practice in Bluehill but then moved to Ellsworth in 1825.

Hathaway served in the State Senate, representing Hancock County, for one year. He moved to Bangor in 1847 and was appointed a Judge of the District Court in 1848. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hubbard on May 11, 1852. He served on the Court until May 11, 1859 when his commission expired. Hathaway died in Bangor on June 6, 1862 at the age of 64.




Sources: In Memoriam Joshua W. Hathaway, 48 ME 599.





(14) Jonas Cutting
Associate Justice 1854-1875


001


Jonas Cutting was born on November 3, 1800 in Croydon, New Hampshire, to Jonas and Betsy (Eames) Cutting. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1823, and read law, first with Henry Hubbard, of Charlestown and then with Reuel Williams of Augusta. He was admitted to the Kennebec Bar in 1826. He first went into practice in Orono and then in 1831 in Bangor.

Cutting was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court on April 20, 1854 by Governor Crosby. He served in that capacity until his retirement on April 20, 1875. Cutting died on August 19, 1876, at the age of 76.




Sources: In Memoriam Jonas Cutting, 65 ME 599.





(15) Seth May
Associate Justice 1855-1862


001


Seth May was born on July 2, 1802 in Winthrop. He was educated at the Monmouth and Hallowell academies, and began his career as an accountant. Unhappy with his employment, he began reading law in 1828 at the office of Dudley Todd at the age of 26. He was admitted to the Kennebec County Bar in 1831. May practiced law in Winthrop from 1831 until 1855. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Morrill on May 6, 1855, and served on the Court until his retirement on May 6, 1862. After his retirement, he returned to private practice and served as the Register of Bankruptcy from 1867 until 1873. May died in Auburn on September 30, 1881, at the age of 79




Sources: In Memoriam Seth May, 74 ME 601.





(16) Woodbury Davis
Associate Justice 1855-1865


001


Woodbury Davis was born on July 25, 1818 in Standish, Maine. At a young age, he moved with his family to the Town of Brooks, in Waldo County, where he was educated. He read law in Belfast and was admitted to the Waldo County Bar in 1847. Davis began his practice in Portland and was appointed State Treasurer in 1855. Davis was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Morrill on October 10, 1855. He was removed by address on April 11, 1856, but was subsequently re-appointed on February 25, 1857. Davis resigned from the Court in 1865, and in 1866 was appointed Postmaster of Portland. He practiced law in Portland with Josiah H. Drummond in the firm of Davis & Drummond. Davis died in Portland on August 17, 1871, at the age of 53.




Sources: Cleaves Justice Index Card.





(17) Daniel Goodenow
Associate Justice 1855-1862


001


Daniel Goodenow was born on October 30, 1793 in Henneker, New Hampshire. He was primarily self-educated, but attended Dartmouth College after gaining admission to its senior class. Before and after his collegiate work, he read law under the tutelage of John Holmes in Alfred and was admitted to the York County Bar in 1817.

Goodenow served as Attorney General for the State of Maine from 1838 to 1842 and served in the Legislature. He was elected Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1830 and unsuccessfully ran as the Whig party candidate for the Governor in 1831, 1832, and 1833. He was then appointed a Judge of the District Court for the Western District.

Goodenow was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Morrill on October 10, 1855. He retired at the end of his first term and died in Alfred on October 7, 1863, at the age of 70.




Sources: In Memoriam Daniel Goodenow, 50 ME 610; William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 3,75.





(18) Edward Kent
Associate Justice 1859-1873


001

Edward Kent was born on January 8, 1802, in Concord, New Hampshire to William Austin Kent and the sister of Prentiss Mellen. He graduated from Harvard College in 1821 and thereafter read law. He was admitted to the Penobscot County Bar in 1821, and began his practice in Bangor

In 1827, Kent was appointed Chief Justice of the Court of Sessions for Penobscot County. From 1829 until 1833, he served in the Legislature. He served as Mayor of Bangor from 1836 until 1838, and Governor of Maine from 1838 until 1840. In 1843, Kent was appointed commissioner by the Legislature to help settle the location of the Maine-New Brunswick line in the border dispute between the United States and Canada ultimately settled by the Webster-Ashburton Treaty. He was a delegate to the 1848 National Whig Convention that nominated General Zachary Taylor for President. From 1849 until 1853, he served as United States consul in Rio Janeiro.

Kent was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Morrill on May 11, 1859. He served on the Court until his retirement on May 11, 1873. Kent died in Bangor on May 19, 1877 at the age of 75.




Sources: In Memoriam Edward Kent, 66 ME 602.





(19) Charles W. Walton
Associate Justice 1862-1897


001


Charles W. Walton was born on December 9, 1819 in Mexico, Maine to Artemas G. and Abigail (Stevens) Walton. Walton was educated by his mother until the age of twelve and seldom attended the local public schools. He spent two years as an apprentice to a printer in New Hampshire. He quit the printing trade, however, to read law and in 1843 was admitted to the Oxford County Bar.

Walton maintained a successful legal practice in Oxford County for many years. He served as Oxford County Attorney from 1847 until 1851, and as Androscoggin County Attorney from 1857 until 1860. Walton was elected as a Republican to the United States House of Representatives where he served from March 4, 1861 until May 26, 1862. He resigned from the House to accept a judicial appointment.

Walton was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Washburn on May 14, 1862. He served for thirty-five years, retiring from the Court on May 14, 1897. Walton died at his home in Portland on January 24, 1900, at the age of 80.




Sources: In Memoriam Charles W. Walton, 94 ME 588; Biographical Directory of the United States Congress (http://bioguide.congress.gov/scripts/biodisplay.pl?index=W000112).





(20) Jonathan Garland Dickerson
Associate Justice 1862-1878


001


Jonathan G. Dickerson was born on November 5, 1811, in Manchester, New Hampshire to Jonathan and Hannah (Garland) Dickerson. He was raised and educated in New Chester, New Hampshire before graduating from Waterville College (now Colby College) in 1836. After college, Dickerson taught in Bath while reading law. Dickerson continued his legal education in Waterville and was admitted to the Lincoln County Bar in 1839.

Dickerson was elected by the City of West Prospect (now Searsport) to the State Legislature in 1842. He served two terms, one by appointment, one by election, as the Waldo County Attorney. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Washburn on October 24, 1862. Dickerson died in office on September 1, 1878, at the age of 67.




Sources: In Memoriam, Jonathan G. Dickerson, 68 ME 595.





(21) Edward Fox
Associate Justice 1862-1863


001


Edward Fox was born on June 5, 1815 in Portland to John and Lucy Jones (Oxnard) Fox. He graduated from Harvard College and received a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1837. He was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1837.

Fox was known as a proficient trial lawyer with an extensive practice. Prior to his appointment on the Court, he served as City Solicitor for Portland and as a State Legislator. Fox was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Washborn on October 24, 1862. He would serve only five months, however, resigning on March 27, 1863, to accept an appointment as the fourth District Judge for the United States District Court of Maine. Fox died in Portland on December 14, 1881, at the age of 66.




Sources: William Willis, A History of the Law, the Courts, and the Lawyers of Maine, Bailey & Noyes, Portland, Maine, 1863, pg. 4.





(22) William G. Barrows
Associate Justice 1863-1884


001


William G. Barrows was born on January 12, 1821 in Yarmouth. After the death of his father in early childhood, Barrows was adopted and raised by his uncle, Rev. Joseph Palmer Fessenden of Bridgton. He was educated by his uncle and later graduated from Bowdoin College in 1839. He studied law with another uncle, General Samuel Fessenden, in Portland and in 1842 was admitted to the Cumberland Bar.

Barrows was elected the Judge of Probate for Cumberland County in 1856. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Coburn on March 27, 1863. He served until March 24, 1884, when he retired after three terms due to illness. Barrows died on April 6, 1886 at the age of 65




Sources: In Memoriam William G. Barrows, 78 ME 584.





(23) Charles Danforth
Associate Justice 1864-1890


001


Charles Danforth was born on August 1, 1815 in Norridgewock to Israel and Sally (Wait) Danforth. He was educated in the local schools and read law at the offices of former Chief Justice John S. Tenney. Danforth was admitted to the Somerset County Bar in 1838 and began his practice in Gorham. He moved to Gardiner and joined the Kennebec Bar in 1841.

Danforth represented Gardiner for four terms in the State Legislature and sat on the Governor’s Executive Council in 1855. He served as the Kennebec County Attorney from 1858 until 1864. Danforth was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cony on January 5, 1864. He served on the Court for over three terms until his death on March 30, 1890, at the age of 74




Sources: In Memoriam Charles Danforth, 83 ME 582.





(24) Rufus P. Tapley
Associate Justice 1865-1872


001


Rufus P. Tapley was born on January 2, 1823 in Danvers, Massachusetts to Rufus and Rebecca Tapley. He was educated in the common schools of Danvers, and at the age of 23 moved to Saco. There he studied law at the office of Bradley and Haines. He was admitted to the York County Bar in May 1848. Tapley maintained a successful private practice from 1848 until 1865 while serving as York County Attorney for six years and representing Saco in the Maine House of Representatives from 1858 until 1864. Tapley was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cony on December 21, 1865. He served on the Court until his retirement on December 21, 1872. He then returned to state politics, and was elected Saco’s representative to the state legislature in 1874. He also served for several years as City Solicitor for Saco and was elected to the Maine State Senate by York County and served from 1885 until 1886. Tapley died at his home in Saco on April 10, 1893, at the age of 70.




Sources: In Memoriam Rufus P. Tapley, 85 ME 579.





(25) William Wirt Virgin
Associate Justice 1872-1893


001


William Wirt Virgin was born on September 18, 1823 in Rumford. His father was Peter Chandler Virgin. Virgin was educated at Bridgton Academy in North Bridgton and Gould Academy in Bethel, and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1844. After college, Virgin read law in his father’s office and was admitted to the Oxford County Bar.

Virgin practiced law in Norway. Virgin was elected Oxford County Attorney, and served as Colonel of the 23rd Maine Volunteer Regiment during the Civil War. After the War, he was elected to the Senate (1865-1866) and served as its President in 1866. Virgin was appointed Reporter of Decisions for two terms from 1866 until 1872. In that year, he moved to Portland.

Virgin was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Perham on December 26, 1872. He served on the Court until his death in Portland on January 23, 1893, at the age of 70.




Sources: In Memoriam William Wirt Virgin, 85 ME 549; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979.





(26) John A. Peters
Associate Justice 1872-1883; Chief Justice 1883-1900


001


John A. Peters was born on October 9, 1822 in Ellsworth to Andrew and Sally (Jordan) Peters. He was educated at Gorham Academy and graduated from Yale College in 1842. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1843, and was admitted to the Hancock County Bar in August 1844.

Peters began his practice in Bangor and during the 1860s served in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. From 1864 until 1866, Peters served as Attorney General. He was elected as a Republican to represent the State of Maine in the United States House of Representatives from 1867 until 1873.

Peters was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Robie on May 15, 1873. He was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Perham on September 20, 1883. Peters served as Chief until his resignation on January 1, 1900. He died in Bangor in April 1, 1904, at the age of 81.




Sources: In Memoriam John A. Peters, 99 ME 541; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 18.





(27) Artemas Libby
Associate Justice 1875-1882, 1883-1894


001


Artemas Libby was born on January 8, 1823 in Freedom. In 1825, he and his family moved to Albion where he attended the local schools. At the age of 17, he began the study of law in the office of Samuel S. Warren and he later read law at the office of Z. Washburne of China. Libby was admitted to the Kennebec County Bar in 1844 at the age of 21.

He moved to Augusta in 1858 after practicing in Albion for eleven years. Libby was elected to represent Augusta in the House of Representatives in 1852. He served on Governor Well’s Executive Council in 1856. Governor Dingley appointed him to the Constitutional Committee in 1875.

Libby was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Dingley on April 23, 1875. He served on the Court until April 23, 1882. Libby was reappointed an Associate Justice by Governor Robie on January 11, 1883 and served in that capacity until his death in Augusta on August 15, 1894, at the age of 71.




Sources: In Memoriam Artemas Libby, 86 ME 584.





(28) Joseph W. Symonds
Associate Justice 1878-1884


001


Joseph W. Symonds was born on September 2, 1840 in Raymond to Joseph and Isabella (Jordan) Symonds. He was educated at Portland High School and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1860, at the age of 20. He read law at the office of Samuel Fessenden, and then with Edward Fox, future Judge of the United States District Court. He was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1864. Symonds practiced law in Portland, and was chosen to be City Solicitor in 1868. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Perham on September 28, 1872. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Connor on October 16, 1878. He served in that capacity until his resignation on March 31, 1884. Symonds returned to private practice and was a member of the Board of Directors of the Maine Central Railroad Company. He died in Portland on September 28, 1918, at the age of 78.




Sources: In Memoriam Joseph W. Symonds, 118 ME 581; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 20.





(29) Lucilius A. Emery
Associate Justice 1883-1906; Chief Justice 1906-1911


001


Lucilius A. Emery was born on July 27, 1840 in Carmel to James S. and Eliza (Wing) Emery. He studied at Hampden Academy and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1861. He read law in the office of A. W. Paine in Bangor. In August 1863, Emery was admitted to the Penobscot County Bar. He joined the Hancock County Bar when he moved to Ellsworth in October 1863. Much of Emery’s private practice was spent as a partner of Senator Eugene Hale.

Emery was elected as Hancock County Attorney at the age of twenty-six, and served in that capacity from 1867 until 1871. He was elected to the State Senate in 1874, 1875, and 1881. In his last term he served as Chairman of the Judiciary Committee. He served as the State Attorney General from 1876 until 1879. Emery was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Robie on October 5, 1883 and he was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Cobb on December 14, 1906. He served as Chief until his resignation on July 27, 1911.

Upon his retirement, Emery lectured on a variety of legal subjects including Roman law at the Maine College of Law and medical jurisprudence at the Maine Medical School. He died on August 26, 1920, at the age of 80.




Sources: In Memoriam Lucilius A. Emery, 120 ME 575; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902.





(30) Enoch Foster
Associate Justice 1884-1898


001


Enoch Foster was born on May 10, 1839 in Newry. He was educated at Gould Academy and the Maine State Seminary, soon to become Bates College. He entered Bowdoin College in 1860, but withdrew to enlist in the Union Army during the Civil War. He served in the 13th Maine regiment, rising to the rank of Lieutenant. After his enlistment expired, he returned to graduate from Bowdoin in 1864. He graduated from Albany Law School in 1865, and was admitted to the Bar in September of the same year.

Foster served two terms as Oxford County Attorney. He also served in the State Senate from 1874 until 1875. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Robie on March 24, 1884. He served on the Court until his commission expired on March 24, 1898. Foster died in Portland on November 17, 1913, at the age of 74.




Source: In Memoriam Enoch Foster, 112 ME 565, E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 19.





(31) Thomas H. Haskell
Associate Justice 1884-1900


001


Thomas H. Haskell was born on May 18, 1842 in New Gloucester, to Captain Peter Haskell, a local farmer, and Betsy (Hawes) Haskell. He was educated in the local schools and gained admission to Bowdoin College. With the outbreak of the Civil War, Haskell left Bowdoin and enlisted in the 25th Regiment of the Maine Volunteers. After the War he studied law under Judge Morrill in Auburn until his admission to the Androscoggin Bar in 1865.

Haskell began his active practice in Portland in 1866 and continued to practice privately there until 1884. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Robie on March 31, 1884. He served on the Court until his death on September 24, 1900, in Portland at the age of 58.




Sources: In Memoriam Thomas H. Haskell, 95 ME 590. Memorandum, 94 ME 617.





(32) William Penn Whitehouse
Associate Justice 1890-1911; Chief Justice 1911-1913


001


William Penn Whitehouse was born on April 9, 1842 in Vassalboro to John Roberts and Hannah (Percival) Whitehouse. He was educated at the Coburn Classical Institute and graduated from Colby College in 1863. He then embarked on a teaching career while reading law at the office of Sewall Lancaster in Augusta. Later, he read law in the Ellsworth office of future United States Senator Eugene Hale and future Maine Supreme Judicial Court Chief Justice Lucilius A. Emery. He was admitted to the Kennebec County Bar in October 1865.

In 1868, Whitehouse was elected City Solicitor of Augusta. He served as the Attorney General from 1869 until 1876. Whitehouse was appointed as the first Justice of the Kennebec County Superior Court on February 13, 1878 by Governor Connor.

Whitehouse was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Burleigh on April 15, 1890 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Plaisted on July 26, 1911. Whitehouse served as Chief until his retirement on April 8, 1913. Whitehouse died on October 10, 1922, at the age of 80.




Sources: In Memoriam William Penn Whitehouse, 122 ME 575; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 11.





(33) Andrew Wiswell
Associate Justice 1893-1900; Chief Justice 1900-1906


001


Andrew P. Wiswell was born on July 11, 1852 in Ellsworth to Arno and Sarah (Peters) Wiswell. He was educated in the Ellsworth schools and at the East Maine Conference Seminary. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1873. He read law and was admitted to the Hancock County Bar in 1874.

Wiswell was elected to the House of Representatives from 1887 to 1891 and served as Speaker of the House during his third term. At the age of 25, he served as a Judge of the Ellsworth Municipal Court.

Wiswell was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cleaves on April 10, 1893 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Powers on January 2, 1900. He served as Chief until his death on December 4, 1906, at the age of 54.




Sources: In Memoriam Andrew P. Wiswell, 103 ME 579; E. C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 140.





(34) Sewall C. Strout
Associate Justice 1894-1908


001


Sewall C. Strout was born on February 17, 1827 in Wales, Maine to Ebenezer and Hannah C. Strout. He was educated in Portland’s schools. He read law and was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in October of 1848 at the age of 21. He began his practice in Bridgton, but after five years moved to Portland in 1854.

Strout was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cleaves on April 12, 1894. He served on the Court until his retirement on April 12, 1908. Strout died on August 10, 1914, at the age of 87




Sources: In Memoriam Sewall C. Strout, 113 ME 575; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 12.





(35) Albert R. Savage
Associate Justice 1897-1917; Chief Justice 1913-1917


001


Albert R. Savage was born on December 8, 1847 in Ryegate, Vermont to Charles W. and Eliza M. Savage. He was educated at Lancaster Academy in New Hampshire and graduated from Dartmouth College in 1871. After reading law, he was admitted to the Androscoggin County Bar in April 1875.

Savage served as County Attorney from 1881 until 1885, and as a Probate Judge from 1885 until 1889. He was elected Mayor of Auburn and served from 1889 until 1891. He was elected to the Legislature (1891-1893) and served as Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1893. Savage served in the State Senate from 1895 until 1897.

Savage was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Powers on May 15, 1897 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Haines on April 9, 1913. He served as Chief until his death on June 14, 1917, at the age of 70.




Sources: In Memoriam Albert R. Savage, 116 ME 533; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 13.





(36) William H. Fogler
Associate Justice 1898-1902


001


William H. Folger was born on November 10, 1837 in Searsmont to Henry and Eliza (McKinney) Folger. He was educated in the common schools of Searsmont and at Kent’s Hill School in Newbury, Vermont. Folger was a student at Colby College and Brownsville College from 1859 until 1860. Early in his career he worked as a teacher and read law in the office of Nehemiah Abbott. He was admitted to the Waldo County Bar in 1862.

Folger served in the 19th Maine Volunteer Regiment during the Civil War and he reached the rank of Colonel. He participated in several of the great battles of the war, including Fredericksburg and Gettysburg. He was severely wounded in battle in 1864. After the war, he served as Waldo County Attorney from 1872 until 1878. He was also elected the Mayor of Belfast and Rockland’s representative to the Legislature.

Folger was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Powers on March 25, 1898. He was the first member of the Court from Knox County. Folger served on the Court until his death on February 18, 1902, in Rockland at the age of 64.




Sources: In Memoriam William H. Folger, 96 ME 577; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 14.





(37) Frederock A. Powers
Associate Justice 1900-1907


001


Frederick A. Powers was born on June 9, 1855 in Pittsfield to Arba and Naomi (Matthews) Powers. He was educated at Maine Central Institute and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1875. After having studied law, Powers was admitted to the Aroostook County Bar in 1876.

Powers served in both the House of Representatives and the Senate. He served as the Attorney General for two terms. He was one of six brothers who practiced law in Maine, including his brother Llewellyn who served as Governor from 1897 until 1901.

Powers was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by his brother, Llewellyn, on January 2, 1900. He was the first attorney from Aroostook County to be appointed to the Court. Powers resigned on March 31, 1907. He died in St. Petersburg, Florida in 1924 at the age of 68.




Sources: In Memoriam Frederick A. Powers, 122 ME 597; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume IV, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 81); E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 15.





(38) Henry C. Peabody
Associate Justice 1900-1911


001


Henry C. Peabody was born on April 14, 1838 in Gilead to John Tarbell and Mercy Ingalls (Burbank) Peabody. He was educated at the local schools, as well as Gould’s Academy and Fryeburg Academy. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1859. He read law at the office of General Samuel Fessenden in Portland. He was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1862. Peabody started his law practice in Portland. He was elected Judge of the Cumberland County Probate Court in 1879, where he served for twenty-one years. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Powers on November 29, 1900. He served on the Court until his death on March 29, 1911 in Portland, at the age of 72




Sources: In Memoriam Henry C. Peabody, 107 ME 549, 569.





(39) Albert M. Spear
Associate Justice 1902-1916; 1917-1923; Actice-Retired 1923-1929


001


Albert M. Spear was born on March 17, 1852 in Madison to Andrew P. and Alice P. (Moore) Spear. He was educated at Monmouth Academy and Waterville Classical Institute, and graduated from Bates College in 1875. After college, he read law with Albert R. Savage, future Maine Supreme Court Chief Justice. He was admitted to the Kennebec County Bar in 1878.

Spear practiced law in Hallowell until 1885, when he moved to Gardiner. While living in Hallowell, he was twice elected to the House of Representatives (1883-1885). He was also elected to the Senate on two occasions while residing in Gardiner. Spear served as its President in 1893. Additionally, Spear was elected Mayor of Gardiner in 1890.

Spear was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hill on March 1, 1902. He served on the Court until March 1, 1916. Spear was re-appointed an Associate Justice of the Court on June 25, 1917, and served until his retirement on July 7, 1923. Spear served as an Active Retired Justice of the Court. He died in Augusta on January 31, 1929, at the age of 76.




Sources: In Memoriam Albert M. Spear, 128 ME 551; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 17; Brief Biography of Maine pg. 242; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979.





(40) Charles F. Woodard
Associate Justice 1906-1907


001


Charles F. Woodard was born on April 19, 1948 in Bangor. His father was Abraham W. Woodward. He was educated in the local public school and Phillips-Exeter Academy. He graduated from Harvard University in 1870, and earned a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1872. He was admitted to the Penobscot County Bar in 1872.

Woodard began his career at first alone and afterwards as a member of the firm of Wilson & Woodard. On three occasions he was offered a position on the Supreme Judicial Court, but declined twice for personal reasons. He accepted his third appointment to the Court from Governor Cobb on December 14, 1906. However, after only two days on the bench, Woodard was stricken with a terminal illness. He struggled to fulfill his role on the Court from a hospital bed in Boston. Woodard died on June 17, 1907, in Bangor, at the age of 59.




Sources: In Memoriam Charles F. Woodard, 103 ME 559.





(41) Leslie C. Cornish
Associate Justice 1907-1917; Chief Justice 1917-1925


001


Leslie W. Cornish was born on October 8, 1854 in Winslow to Colby Combs and Pauline B. (Simpson) Cornish. He was educated first at the Winslow public schools, then at the Coburn Classical Institute. Cornish graduated from Colby College with high honors in 1875.

After Colby, Cornish began a truncated career in education, serving as both teacher and principal of Petersborough High School in New Hampshire. He read law at the firm of Baker & Baker in Augusta for one year before entering Harvard Law School. He attended Harvard Law for only one year before returning to Maine, and was admitted to the Kennebec Bar in November 1880.

In 1878, Cornish was elected by the Town of Winslow to a single term in the State House of Representatives. He also served on the Common Council and Board of Alderman for the City of Augusta. In 1922, Cornish was selected to join United States Supreme Court Chief Justice Taft on a Committee for the American Bar Association to draft a code of judicial ethics.

On March 31, 1907, Cornish was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cobb. He served until June 25, 1917, when he was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Milliken. He resigned from the Court on March 1, 1925, due to ill health. Cornish died on June 24, 1925, at the age of 71




Sources: In Memoriam, Leslie C. Cornish, 125 ME 543; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 167.





(42) Arno W. King
Associate Justice 1907-1918


001


Arno W. King was born on August 2, 1855 in Lamoine to Warren and Mary King. He was educated in the local schools and attended the Coburn Classical Institute. He attended Colby College, but did not graduate before he left to study law. King graduated from the Boston University School of Law in 1883, and was admitted to the Hancock County Bar the same year at the age of 28.

King began his practice in Ellsworth, and in 1884 joined the later-to-be Chief Justice Andrew P. Wiswell in starting the firm of Wiswell & King.

King was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cobb on June 28, 1907. He served on the Court until his death on July 21, 1918, in Ellsworth at the age of 63.




Sources: In Memoriam Arno W. King, 118 ME 561.





(43) George E. Bird
Associate Justice 1908-1918


001


George E. Bird was born on September 1, 1847 in Portland to Robert A. and Sarah (Emerson) Bird. He attended Portland High School and graduated from Harvard in 1869. After graduating, he read law in the offices of William H. Clifford and was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1872.

Bird held the office of United States District Attorney for the District of Maine from 1885 until 1890. He served in the House of Representatives from 1893 until 1895. From 1896 until 1908, he was senior partner in the firm of Bird & Bradley in Portland.

Bird was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cobb on April 13, 1908. He resigned from the Court on August 28, 1918. In 1923, he was appointed an Active Retired Justice of the Court. Bird died in his home in Yarmouth on January 19, 1926 at the age of 78.




Sources: In Memoriam, George E. Bird, 125 ME 571; Brief Biographies of Maine pg. 30.





(44) George F. Haley
Associate Justice 1911-1918


001


George F. Haley was born on January 30, 1856 in Saco to Henry U. and Martha P. Haley. He was educated in the town’s common schools until the age of twelve. He spent the next eleven years laboring in the local mills and factories, finding it necessary to leave school in order to help support his family. He spent two years studying law under the tutelage of Benjamin F. Hamilton of Biddeford. Haley was admitted to the York County Bar in 1881 and formed a partnership with his brother Leroy in Biddeford.

After thirty years in private practice, Haley was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Plaisted on April 12, 1911. He served on the Court until his death on February 19, 1918, at the age of 62.




Sources: In Memoriam George F. Haley, 117 ME 585.





(45) George M. Hanson
Associate Justice 1911-1924


001


George M. Hanson was born on August 28, 1856 in Elmsville, New Brunswick. He moved with his parents to Calais two years later. He graduated from the Calais Academy in 1875, and thereafter read law at the office of Archibald MacNichol. He was admitted to the Washington County Bar in 1877 at the age of 21.

Hanson was elected Mayor of Calais in 1885, and again in 1905. He was appointed Collector of Customs for the Passamaquoddy District by President Cleveland in 1895. He was a delegate to the Democratic National Convention from Maine in 1904, and made several unsuccessful bids for the House of Representatives from Maine’s 4th District.

Hanson was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Plaisted on July 26, 1911. He served on the Court until his death in Portland on April 4, 1924 at the age of 68.




Sources: In Memoriam George M. Hanson, 124 ME 517.





(46) Warren C. Philbrook
Associate Justice 1913-1928


001


Warren C. Philbrook was born on November 30, 1857 in Sedgwick to Luther G. and Angelica (Coffin). He was educated at the Coburn Classical Institute and graduated from Colby College in 1882. After serving as a teacher and principal of Waterville High School, he read law and was admitted to the Kennebec Bar in October of 1884.

Philbrook served the City of Waterville and the State of Maine in several capacities. He served as a Judge of the Municipal Court of Waterville; was elected mayor of Waterville for two terms from 1899 until 1900; was an elected member of the House of Representatives and chairman of the Republican State Committee; and served as Maine Attorney General from 1909 to 1911.

Philbrook was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Haines on April 9, 1913. He served on the Court until his retirement and was appointed an Active Retired Justice on November 9, 1928. He died on May 31, 1933, in Waterville at the age of 75.




Sources: In Memoriam Warren C. Philbrook, 132 ME 529; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 181; Brief Biography pg. 205.





(47) John B. Madigan
Associate Justice 1916-1918


001


John B. Madigan was born on January 4, 1863 in Houlton to James C. and Mary Anna Madigan. He was educated at St. Joseph’s Academy and Houlton Academy and graduated from Georgetown University in 1883. He received his law degree at the Boston University School of Law in 1886 and was admitted to the Aroostook County Bar in 1885.

Madigan was a member of the Legislature in 1889 and he practiced law in his hometown of Houlton. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Oakley C. Curtis on March 1, 1916. He was the second Aroostook County lawyer to be appointed to the Court. He served in that capacity until his death on January 19, 1918, at the age of 55.




Sources: In Memoriam John B. Madigan, 117 ME 597; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 65.





(48) Charles J. Dunn, Jr.
Associate Justice 1918-1935; Chief Justice 1935-1939


001


Charles F. Dunn was born on July 14, 1872 in Houghton, Michigan. His early education took place at the Bluehill Academy in Maine and in Poughkeepsie, New York. He read law in Bluehill in the office of Judge E.E. Chase, and in Ellsworth in the firm of Hale & Hamlin.

Dunn began his law practice in Orono in 1892. He was elected by the City of Orono to the Maine House of Representatives and served one term from 1901 to 1902. He was active in politics, serving as a delegate at large at the 1908 Republican National Convention in Chicago. He also served for a number of years as Treasurer of the University of Maine.

From 1903 to 1911, Dunn sat as a Judge in the Old Town Municipal Court. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Milliken on January 28, 1918. He was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Brann on July 18, 1935, where he served until his death on November 10, 1939, at his home in Orono, at the age of 67.




Sources: In Memoriam Charles J. Dunn, Jr., 137 ME 363; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 84); E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 237.





(49) John A. Morrill
Associate Justice 1918-1926; Active Retired Justice 1926-1933


001


John A. Morrill was born on June 3, 1855 in Auburn to Nahum and Anna Isabella Littlefield Morrill. He was educated at Edward Little High School and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1876. He received a Masters of Arts degree from Bowdoin in 1879. Morrill was admitted to the Androscoggin Bar in 1880.

In 1900, Morrill was named to the State Board of Examiners for Applicants for Admission to the Bar. He was also named Commissioner of the Committee to Revise and Consolidate the Laws of Maine in both 1901 and 1923. He served as President of the Maine Bar Association in 1907 and in 1912 he was elected Probate Judge for Androscoggin County, a position he held until 1918.

Morrill was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Milliken on February 25, 1918. He served on the Court until his resignation on May 31, 1926. He was, however, appointed an Active Retired Justice, where he served with distinction until June 4, 1933. Morrill died in Auburn on August 25, 1945, at the age of 90.




Sources: In Memoriam John A. Morrill, 142 ME 425; Brief Biography of Maine pg. 123





(50) Scott Wilson
Associate Justice 1918-1925: Chief Justice 1925-1929


001


Scott Wilson was born on January 11, 1870 in Falmouth to Nathaniel B. and Loenama (Pearson) Wilson. He was educated at the Greeley Institute and the Nichols Latin School in Lewiston, and graduated from Bates College in 1892 with a degree in psychology. He also attended the University of Pennsylvania. For two years, Wilson taught at the Haverford School in Pennsylvania. He studied law in the Portland office of future Supreme Judicial Court Justice Joseph W. Symonds and was admitted to the bar in 1895.

After engaging in private practice in Portland, he served as City Solicitor for both Deering and Portland. Wilson served as Assistant Cumberland County Attorney from 1901 until 1902. He served as the Attorney General from 1913 until 1915.

Wilson was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Milliken on August 7, 1918 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Brewster on March 1, 1925. Wilson served as Chief until his retirement on October 7, 1929. He died on October 22, 1942, at the age of 71.




Sources: In Memoriam Scott Wilson, 140 ME 367; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 448); E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 140.





(51) Luere B. Deasy
Associate Justice 1918-1929: Chief Justice 1929-1930


001


Luere B. Deasy was born on February 8, 1859 in Gouldsboro to Daniel and Emma L. (Moore) Deasy. He was educated at the State Normal School in Castine. He did not attend college, but received a law degree from Boston University Law School. Deasy was admitted to the Bar in 1884.

Prior to sitting on the Court, Deasy practiced in Bar Harbor. Deasy served as President of both the Hancock County Bar Association and the Maine State Bar Association. He was elected to the Maine State Senate and served as its President.

Deasy was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Milliken on September 25, 1918. On October 1, 1929, he was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Gardiner. He served as Chief until his retirement on February 7, 1930, when he returned to private practice in Bar Harbor. Deasy died on March 13, 1940, in Portland, at the age of 81.




Sources: In Memoriam, Luere B. Deasy, 138 ME 371; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979.





(52) Guy H. Sturgis
Associate Justice 1923-1940: Chief Justice 1940-1949


001


Guy H. Sturgis was born on March 3, 1877 in New Gloucester to John I. and Myra (Hayden) Sturgis. He was educated in the town’s common schools, and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1898. He received a law degree from Columbia University Law School in 1899, and studied law at the office of Thomas B. Reed.

Sturgis began the practice in law in Portland in 1900. He served on the Board of Alderman of the City of Portland, and served on the Republican State Committee. He was elected Attorney General of the State of Maine in 1917 and served until 1921.

Sturgis was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Baxter on August 14, 1923. After seventeen years on the bench, Sturgis was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Barrows on August 8, 1940. He served in that capacity until his resignation on March 1, 1949. Sturgis died on January 18, 1951, at the age of 73.


Source: In Memoriam Guy H. Sturgis, 146 ME 461; Brief Biographies of Maine pg. 250.





(53) Charles P. Barnes
Associate Justice 1924-1929: Chief Justice 1929-1940


001

Charles Putnam Barnes was born on October 12, 1869 in Houlton to Francis and Isa A. (Putnam) Barnes. He was educated in Houlton’s public schools, the Ricker Classical Institute and later Houlton Academy. He received both a Bachelor of Arts (1892) and Master of Arts (1893) from Colby College. After an eight-year career in education, he began reading law in Portland under Justice Joseph W. Symonds. Barnes was admitted to the Oxford County Bar in 1900 and soon after began practicing law in Norway, Maine.

Barnes served as County Attorney for Oxford County from 1904 until 1909. He served as the Deputy Attorney General of Maine from 1909 until 1911. In 1911, Barnes moved his family to Houlton and was elected the Town’s Representative to the Legislature for three terms from 1917 until 1923. Barnes was both the Republican floor leader and Speaker during his service in the House of Representatives.

Barnes was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Baxter on April 17, 1924. He was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Barrows on November 21, 1939. Barnes served as Chief until his retirement on July 31, 1940. He died on December 14, 1951 at the age of 82.


Sources: In Memoriam Charles Putnam Barnes, 149 ME 439; Brief Biographies of Maine (pg 22); Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume IV, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 3).





(54) Norman L. Bassett
Associate Justice 1925-1930


001


Norman L. Bassett was born on June 23, 1869, in Winslow, son of Josiah W. and Susan (Cornish) Bassett. He attended Winslow schools, later graduating from the Coburn Classical Institute in 1887. He received a Bachelor of Arts degree from Colby College in 1891.

After a brief stint as a Greek and Latin instructor at Colby, Bassett graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1898, where he was one of the fourteen editors of the Law Review (Vol. 11). Bassett was admitted to the Bar in October 1898, and with his uncle (future Chief Justice Leslie C. Cornish) established the firm Cornish & Bassett in Augusta. He served as a member of the Maine Enforcement Committee from 1905 to 1907, and as Secretary of the Maine Bar Association from 1907 to 1925.

Bassett was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brewster on March 26, 1925. He retired from the Court on September 15, 1930. Bassett died on September 29, 1931 at the age of 62


Sources: In Memoriam, Norman L. Bassett, 130 ME 541.





(55) William R. Pattangall
Associate Justice 1926-1930; Chief Justice 1930-1935


001


William R. Pattangall was born on June 29, 1865 in Pembroke to Ezra Lincoln and Arethusa (Longfellow) Pattangall. He was educated at the local public school and graduated from the University of Maine in 1884. He studied law at the office of Archibald MacNichol in Calais. Before completing his studies, however, Pattangall joined the crew of his brother’s vessel, the Syra, for two years during which he sailed to various South American ports.

Pattangall returned to Machiasport in 1891 and taught in the town’s public schools for two years. All the while, he studied law and was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1893. He represented Machias in the House of Representatives in 1897 and again in 1901. He served as editor of the Machias Union, from 1903 until 1909.

Pattangall also served as editor of the Waterville Sentinel from 1905 until 1915. He represented Waterville in the Legislature in 1909 and 1911. He was elected Mayor of Waterville in 1911, 1912, and 1913, and was elected Attorney General in 1911 and 1915.

Pattangall moved to Augusta in 1915 where he was several times an unsuccessful candidate for the United States Congress and Governor. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brewster on July 2, 1926. On February 7, 1930, he was appointed Chief Justice by the Governor Gardiner. He served as Chief until his retirement on July 16, 1935. Pattangall died on October 21, 1942, at the age of 77.


Sources: In Memoriam William R. Pattangall, 140 ME 329; Brief Biographies of Maine, pg. 198; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 423); E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 245.





(56) Frank G. Farrington
Associate Justice 1928-1933


001


Frank G. Farrington was born on September 11, 1872, in Augusta to Frankin L. and Cordelia (Wilson) Farrington. He was educated at Cony High School and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1894. He then began a career in education, serving as principal at Machias High School from 1894 until 1896, and Skowhegan High School from 1897 until 1899.

During his last year in Skowhegan, Farrington read law at the office of Amos K. Butler and later returned to Augusta to study law under the tutelage of the later-to-be Chief Justice Leslie C. Cornish. Farrington attended Harvard Law School, graduating in 1902. He was admitted to the Maine Bar in Augusta in 1902.

Farrington served as the Secretary of the Maine Senate from 1905 until 1909. He was elected Augusta’s representative to the Legislature from 1919 until 1920, serving as the Speaker of the House of Representatives in 1919. Farrington represented Kennebec County as a State Senator from 1921 until 1924, and was elected President of the Senate in 1923. In 1924, Farrington campaigned for the Republican nomination for Governor but was narrowly defeated in the primary.

Farrington was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brewster on November 16, 1928. Farrington was stricken by a fatal illness and died while sitting on the Court on September 3, 1933, at the age of 61.


Sources: In Memoriam Frank G. Farrington, 132 ME 545; Brief Biographies of Maine pg 92; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979.





(57) Sidney St. Felix Thaxter
Associate Justice 1930-1954; Active Retired Justice 1954-1958


001


Sidney St. Felix Thaxter was born on March 4, 1883 in Portland to Sidney Warren and Julia (St. Felix) Thaxter. He was educated at Portland High School and graduated from Harvard University in 1904, where he was the classmate of Franklin Delano Roosevelt. Thaxter graduated cum laude from Harvard Law School in 1907, and was associate editor of the Harvard Law Review (Vol. 20). He was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1907.

Thaxter practiced privately with several firms and was recorder of the Portland Municipal Court from 1919 until 1923. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Gardiner on January 1, 1930.

Thaxter was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Gardiner on September 16, 1930. He served on the Court until his retirement on February 28, 1954. He accepted an appointment as an Active Retired Justice on March 3, 1954, and served as such until his death on June 30, 1958, in Portland at the age of 75.


Sources: In Memoriam Sidney St. Felix Thaxter, 154 ME 411; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 41).





(58) James H. Hudson
Associate Justice 1933-1947


001


James H. Hudson was born on March 21, 1878 in Guilford to Henry and Ada (Lougee) Hudson. He was educated at the Coburn Classical Institute and graduated from Colby College in 1900. He received a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1903, and was admitted to the Piscataquis County Bar in September of that year.

Hudson began his practice of law in Guilford in the firm of Hudson & Hudson. He served for three years as Chairman of the Selectmen of Guilford. He also served as the Piscataquis County Attorney for seven years.

Hudson’s career behind the bench began with a five-year stint as a Probate Judge. He was selected by Governor Gardiner as one of the three new justices of the statewide Superior Court when it first came into existence on January 1, 1930. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brann on November 20, 1933. He served on the Court until his death on August 21, 1947 at the age of 69.


Sources: Cleaves Justice Index Card; Piscataquis County Courthouse, Maine Reporter 522-536 A.2d.





(59) Harry Manser
Associate Justice 1935-1946; Active Retired Justice 1946-1955


001


Harry Manser was born on April 20, 1874 in Hever, Kent County, England to William and Eliza (Canham) Manser. He was educated in London and immigrated to America with his mother and two sisters when he was thirteen years old. He graduated from Lewiston High School in 1893. His experience in the art of shorthand gained him employment in the firm of Frye, Cotton & White where he was also given the opportunity to read law. He was admitted to the Androscoggin Bar in September 1896.

In 1903, Manser opened his own legal practice in Lewiston. He served as Solicitor for the City in 1897 and 1898. Manser served as a Judge of the Auburn Municipal Court from 1903 until 1911, and again from 1918 until 1926. From 1911 until 1912, he was City Solicitor for Auburn.

Manser was appointed to the Superior Court by Governor Brewster on April 1, 1928. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brann on July 18, 1935. Manser sat on the Court until his retirement on March 20, 1946. Shortly thereafter, he accepted an appointment as an Active Retired Justice. Manser died on February 20, 1955, at the age of 80.


Sources: In Memoriam Harry Manser, 152 ME 483; E.C. Bowley, Album of Attorneys of Maine, Bethel, Maine, News Publishing Company, Copyright 1902, pg. 39.





(60) George H. Worster
Associate Justice 1939-1942


001

George H. Worster was born on September 5, 1871 in Bangor to George W. and Margaret A. (Nason) Worster. He was educated at the Kenduskeag Free School and gave the salutatory address at his graduation in 1889. He then attended Hampden Academy for one year. In 1893, Worster worked as a messenger at the Penobscot County Courthouse and read law at the office of Charles A. Bailey and former Governor Davis. He was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1895 and the United States Circuit Court Bar in 1900.

Worster began practicing law in Bangor. In an unusual set of circumstances, he began teaching at the University of Maine School of Law in 1903, shortly before receiving, first a Bachelors degree, and then a Masters degree, in law from the University in 1905 and 1906 respectively. Worster was named an Associate Professor of the law school in 1912 and taught until 1916.

Worster was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court of Penobscot County by Governor Baxter on November 5, 1924. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Barrows on December 21, 1939. He sat on the Court until his retirement on July 31, 1942. Worster died in Bangor on February 26, 1965, at the age of 93.


Sources: In Memoriam George H. Worster; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY.





(61) Harold H. Murchie
Associate Justice 1940-1949; Chief Justice 1949-1953


001


Harold H. Murchie was born on March 8, 1888 in Calais. He graduated from Dartmouth College in 1909, and earned a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1912. He was admitted to the Kennebec Bar in 1912.

Murchie served as an Assistant Attorney General from 1913 until 1914. He was elected to the House of Representatives in 1919 and served therein until 1921. He served as the Washington County Attorney from 1925 until 1927 and as a member of the Maine Senate from 1929 until 1933, serving as its President in 1933. Murchie was a member of the 1929 Legislative Committee on Revision of the Statutes for the State of Maine. He also served as President of the Maine Bar Association from 1939 until 1940.

Murchie was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Barrows on August 8, 1940. He was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Payne on March 3, 1949. Murchie served as Chief until his death on March 7, 1953, one day shy of his 65th birthday.


Sources: In Memoriam Harold H. Murchie, XX ME XXX; Brief Biography of Maine pg. 186; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979.





(62) Arthur Chapman
Associate Justice 1942-1945; Active Retired Justice 1945-1952


001


Arthur Chapman was born on August 6, 1873 in Deering (now part of Portland), to Albion P. and Elizabeth M. (Foss) Chapman. He was educated at Deering High School, and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1894. Prior to his legal career, Chapman was a teacher in Michigan and Connecticut, and was the first football coach of Portland High School.

Chapman served in the Common Council for the City of Portland and eventually became its President. He was also on the Board of Alderman for Portland. Chapman served as the United States District Attorney for Maine from 1904 until 1915, when he was appointed a United States Commissioner.

Chapman was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1900. He practiced privately for twenty-three years until March 12, 1925, when he was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Brewster. On November 4, 1942, Governor Sewall appointed Chapman an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, where he served until his retirement on August 5, 1945. He served as an Active Retired Justice until August 8, 1952. Chapman died on January 5, 1959 at the age of 85.


Sources: In Memoriam, Arthur Chapman, 155 ME 444; Brief Biographies of Maine, pg. 51.





(63) Nathaniel Tompkins
Associate Justice 1945-1949


001


Nathaniel Tompkins was born on May 17, 1879 in Bridgewater to Nathaniel and Emma (Sargent) Tompkins. He was educated in the public school of Bridgewater and at the Ricker Classical Institute. He graduated from Colby College in 1903, and received a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1907. He was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1907 and began the practice of law in Houlton.

Tompkins served as a Selectman of the Town of Houlton, and served in both the Maine House of Representatives (1931, 1933, and 1935) and Senate (1939 and 1941). He was Speaker of the House in 1935, and President of the Senate in 1941. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Sewall on October 9, 1941.

Tompkins was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hildreth on August 23, 1945. He served on the Court until his death on April 22, 1949, at the age of 69.


Sources: In Memoriam Nathaniel Tompkins, 149 ME 439; James H. Mundy, Presidents of the Maine State Senate from 1820, Secretary of the Senate of Maine, 1979. NOTE: Tompkins was the father if Sigrid E. Tompkins, Esq.





(64) Raymond Fellows
Associate Justice 1946-1954; Chief Justice 1954-1956


001


Raymond Fellows was born on October 17, 1885, in Bucksport to Oscar F. and Eva M. (Fling) Fellows. He was educated at the Eastern Maine Conference Seminary in Bucksport, later the University of Maine, and graduated in 1908 from the University of Maine, from which he also received a Master of Arts degree in 1926. Fellows received a law degree from the University of Maine College of Law in Bangor in 1909. He was admitted to the Penobscot County Bar on August 10, 1909, and began his practice in Bangor.

Fellows served as Attorney General for the State of Maine from 1925 until 1929, during which he argued several cases before the United States Supreme Court. He was appointed a Justice to the Superior Court on December 29, 1939 by Governor Barrows. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hildreth on May 1, 1946 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Cross on April 7, 1954. He resigned from the Court on September 15, 1956.

Fellows served as President of the Bangor Historical Society from 1933 until 1957. He also acted as Chairman of the Maine Citizen’s Committee on the Survey of State Government. Fellows died on September 3, 1957 at the age of 72.


Sources: In Memoriam Raymond Fellows, 153 ME 522; Brief Biographies of Maine, pg. 92; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 155-156).





(65) Edward P. Murray
Associate Justice 1947-1948; Active Retired Justice 1948-1962


001


Edward P. Murray was born on April 7, 1876 in Bangor to Patrick and Catherine (Curran) Murray. He was educated at Bangor High School and then took a position coaching football in Bar Harbor. He graduated from the University of Maine School of Law in 1903 and was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1904.

Murray maintained a successful practice for several years before being appointed Judge of the Superior Court by Governor Brann on July 18, 1935. He served on the Superior Court for twelve years.

Murray was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hildreth on September 18, 1947. He served on the Court until his retirement less than a year later on April 6, 1948. Murray served two full terms as an Active Retired Justice, ending in September 1962. Murray died in Bangor on January 22, 1966, at the age of 89.


Sources: In Memorandum Edward P. Murray. NOTE: Murray’s granddaughter is Judge Ann M. Murray





(66) Edward F. Merrill
Associate Justice 1948-1953; Chief Justice 1953-1954


001


Edward F. Merrill was born on April 11, 1883 in Skowhegan to Edward N. and Anna (Folsom) Merrill. He was educated at the local schools, and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1903. He received a law degree with high honors from Harvard Law School in 1906 and was admitted to the bar in 1906.

Merrill was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth on February 1, 1945. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Hildreth on June 2, 1948 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Cross on March 18, 1953. He retired from the Court on April 7, 1954.

Merrill served as a legislative consultant for many years for Central Maine Power Company and as President of the Maine State Bar Association from 1933 until 1935. He died in Skowhegan on January 31, 1962, at the age of 78.


Sources: In Memorandum Edward F. Merrill, 158 ME 513.





(67) William B. Nulty
Associate Justice 1949-1953


001


William B. Nulty was born on January 28, 1888 in Buckfield to Henry H. and Lucretia (Bridgham) Nulty. He was educated in the Buckfield public schools and attended Hebron Academy and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1910. Nulty spent his early postgraduate years teaching chemistry and physics, and coaching football, at high schools in Portland and South Portland. He attended law school at both the University of Maine and Columbia, earning a Bachelor of Laws degree.

Nulty was admitted to the Cumberland County Bar in 1917 and joined the firm of Bradley & Linnell, becoming a partner in 1922. He served as an Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Maine for twelve years.

On September 18, 1947, Nulty was appointed a Justice to the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth. On March 16, 1949, Governor Payne appointed him an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, where he sat until his death on September 11, 1953 at the age of 65.


Sources: In Memorandum William B. Nulty, 152 ME 479; Brief Biography of Maine pg. 192





(68) Robert B. Williamson
Associate Justice 1949-1956, Chief Justice 1956-1970


001


Robert B. Williamson was born on August 23, 1899 in Augusta to Joseph and Vallie (Burleigh) Williamson. He was educated at Cony High School and Phillips Academy. He received an undergraduate degree from Harvard University and was editor of the Harvard Crimson. After serving as an officer in World War I, he studied law and worked summers as a reporter for the Kennebec Journal.

After passing the Maine Bar, Williamson was appointed United States Commissioner for Kennebec County. He resigned this post in 1928 to serve one term in the Legislature in 1929. During World War II, Williamson served as a State Attorney for the Office of Price Administration, and on the City Rationing Board, and was the Director for the Kennebec County Civilian Defense effort.

Williamson was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth on September 5, 1945. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Payne on May 5, 1949 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Muskie on October 4, 1956. He retired from the Court on August 21, 1970. Williamson was active in the law after retiring from the bench, lecturing at the University of Maine School of Law and chairing the Advisory Committee for Maine Rules of Evidence. He died on December 27, 1976, at the age of 77.


Sources: In Memoriam Robert B. Williamson, Maine Reporter, 367-375 Me Rep. 5





(69) Frank A. Tirrell
Associate Justice 1953-1955


001


Frank A. Tirrell, Jr. was born on March 30, 1893 in Quincy, Massachusetts. He was educated in the town’s public schools. He graduated from the University of Maine School of Law in 1915, and relocated to Rockland.

Tirrell was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth on May 15, 1946. He was appointed Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cross on March 18, 1953. Tirrell served on the Court until his death on June 4, 1955, at the age of 62.


Sources: In Memoriam Frank A. Tirrell, Jr., 152 ME 469.





(70) Donald W. Webber
Associate Justice 1953-1973


001


Donald W. Webber was born on November 19, 1906 in Auburn to George Curtis and Fannie (Saunders) Webber. He attended the Auburn schools, was a 1927 graduate of Bowdoin College, and a 1931 graduate of Harvard Law School. He held honorary degrees from many colleges, including Bates College and the University of Maine, and served many years as a trustee of Bangor Theological Seminary and Westbrook College, and as overseer of Bowdoin College. Following law school, Webber began his practice in Auburn. During World War II, he was an officer in the Naval Reserve.

Webber was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth on September 1, 1948. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cross on October 8, 1953. Following his retirement from the Court on July 31, 1973, Webber became of counsel to the firm of Linnell, Choate & Webber and heard cases referred by the Superior Court for another seventeen years. He died on November 15, 1995, at the age of 88.


Sources: Obituaries from Kennebec Journal (11/16/05) and Bangor Daily News (11/16/95)





(71) Albert Beliveau
Associate Justice 1954-1958


001


Albert Beliveau was born on March 27, 1887 in Lewiston, the eldest of five children, to Severin and Cedulie (Roberge) Beliveau. He was educated in the schools of Lewiston and Livermore Falls until the age of thirteen when he began an apprenticeship at his father’s bakery. After working in foundries and paper mills, Beliveau read law for four years at the office of Matthew McCarthy. He graduated from the University of Maine School of Law in 1911, and was admitted to the Bar the same year, having attained the highest score on the bar examination.

Beliveau served as Oxford County Attorney until the advent of World War I when he enlisted in the United States Army. He was commissioned a Lieutenant in the Judge Advocate General’s Corps, and was stationed in France. After the war, Beliveau was active in the Democratic Party in Maine and ran unsuccessfully for United States Congress in 1920 and 1922.

Beliveau was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Brann on July 18, 1935. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cross on March 3, 1954. Beliveau retired from the Court on March 25, 1958, returning to Rumford to practice law with his two sons. He died on October 23, 1971 at the age of 85.


Sources: In Memoriam Albert Beliveau, Maine Reporter 293-299 A.2d; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume IV, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg. 299-300); Brief Biographies of Maine pg 26.





(72) Walter M. Tapley, Jr.
Associate Justice 1954-1969


001


Walter M. Tapley, Jr. was born on July 2, 1898 in Rockland to Walter M. and Katie Ingraham (Nixon) Tapley. He was educated in the Rockland and Portland public schools. He studied law in the office of his uncle, Harry E. Nixon, and was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1920.

Tapley served as Deputy Clerk of the Courts until 1926 and served as Cumberland County Attorney for three terms, beginning in 1931. In 1938, he was appointed Reporter of Decisions by Governor Barrows, a position he held until 1941.

Tapley was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Cross on March 3, 1954. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Cross on May 5, 1954. Tapley succeeded to Raymond Fellows’ seat on the Court after Fellows became Chief Justice on April 7, 1954. He continued on the Court until his retirement on June 30, 1969. Tapley died on November 23, 1971, at the age of 73.


Sources: In Memoriam Walter M. Tapley, Jr., Maine Reporter, 293-299 Me. Rep.





(73) Percy T. Clarke
Associate Justice 1955-1956; Active Retired Justice 1956-1957


001


Percy T. Clarke was born on June 19, 1885 in Franklin to James Willard and Mabel (Lillian) Clarke. As a young man, Clarke received an injury while working in a sawmill that ultimately required the amputation of his left hand. He was educated at the Maine Central Institute and graduated from the University of Maine in 1912 with a Bachelor of Laws degree.

After graduation, Clarke embarked on a career in education, teaching in the public schools of Bradley, Steuben, Bradford and Franklin, where he became Superintendent of Schools. Clarke began his law practice in Stonington in 1914. He was twice elected as its representative to the Maine Legislature (1921 and 1923), and served one term in the Maine Senate (1925). In 1929, Clarke moved to Ellsworth. There he served as Hancock County Attorney for six years from 1930 until 1936. He also served briefly as High Sheriff of Hancock County.

Clarke was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Hildreth on October 1, 1947. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Muskie on June 29, 1955, where he sat until his resignation on June 7, 1956. Thereafter, Clarke served as an Active Retired Justice until shortly before his death on August 25, 1957, at the age of 72.


Sources: In Memoriam, Percy T. Clarke, 154 ME 396; Brief Biographies of Maine pg 56.





(74) F. Harold Dubord
Associate Justice 1955-1956


001


F. Harold Dubord was born on December 14, 1891 in Waterville to Harry and Mary (Poulin) Dubord. He was educated at Waterville High School, and attended Colby College from 1910 until 1912. For the next seven years, Dubord worked in the retail clothing industry, and served as City Treasurer of Waterville, as well as Clerk to the City’s Common Council. Dubord, who attended the University of Maine School of Law in its last year of operation, ultimately earned a law degree from Boston University Law School in 1922.

Dubord was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1922. He served five terms as the Mayor of Waterville, and fifteen years as a member of the Democratic National Committee. Dubord campaigned unsuccessfully for United States Senate in 1934, for Governor of Maine in 1936, and for Congress in 1938.

Dubord was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Muskie on June 29, 1955. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Muskie on October 4, 1956. He served on the Court until his retirement on December 10, 1962. Dubord died in Waterville on October 14, 1964, at the age of 72.


Sources: In Memoriam, F. Harold Dubord, Maine Reporter, 161 ME 670; Brief Biographies of Maine, pg. 83.





(75) Francis W. Sullivan
Associate Justice 1956-1965


001


Francis W. Sullivan was born on July 15, 1894 in Portland to John William and Margaret Ellen (Kilday) Sullivan. He was educated at Portland High School, where he received the Brown Medal. He attended the College of the Holy Cross, but transferred to Georgetown University, where he graduated with honors in 1916. While attending Georgetown, he was awarded the Faculty Medal by Chief Justice Edward D. White of the United States Supreme Court. He graduated from the Wharton School of Finance at the University of Pennslyvania. After a brief time in the banking business, Sullivan entered Harvard Law School. However, his studies were interrupted by World War I, when he served in army intelligence. Sullivan earned a law degree from Harvard in 1919.

Sullivan returned to Portland to practice law in 1920. He was most widely recognized for his efforts in the field of municipal corporations, and at one time he represented over two hundred towns in the State of Maine. He authored The Maine Civil Officer, a two volume text.

Sullivan was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Payne on April 5, 1949. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Muskie on October 4, 1956. He retired from the Court on July 10, 1965. Sullivan died on January 7, 1967, at the age of 72.


Sources: In Memoriam Francis W. Sullivan, 237-248 Me Rep.





(76) Cecil J. Siddall
Associate Justice 1958-1965


001


Cecil J. Siddall was born on March 2, 1894 in Sanford to Thomas and Lillie (Sutcliffe) Siddall who came to this country from England. He was educated at Sanford High School and graduated with a law degree from the University of Maine School of Law in 1916. He was the only attorney admitted to the York County Bar in 1916. He enlisted in the United States Army during World War I and served as an ordnance sergeant.

Siddall was active in the legal community of Maine, serving as Reporter of Decisions from 1946 until 1949. He also served as a Selectman of the Town of Sanford, as a Representative to the Legislature (1923), and Register of Probate Court for York County.

Siddall was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Cross on August 19, 1953. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Muskie on May 7, 1958, and served in that capacity until his retirement on February 27, 1965. Siddall died on July 1, 1986, at the age of 92.


Sources: In Memoriam Cecil J. Siddall, Maine Reporter 522-536 A.2d; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 271).





(77) Harold Chesterfield Marden
Associate Justice 1962-1970


001


Harold C. Marden was born on July 28, 1900 in East Vassalboro to Frank Allen and Nellie Angelina (Fuller) Marden. He was educated in the local one-room schoolhouse, and at the Oak Grove Seminary. He graduated from Colby College, and earned a law degree from Harvard Law School in 1924.

Marden began his own private practice in Waterville, and later served as the City’s Solicitor. He also served as the County Attorney and as a State Senator. A member of the National Guard since 1927, Marden served in the Pacific theater during World War II. He attained the rank of Colonel in the 43rd Infantry Division, and took part in the battles for the Solomon and Philippine Islands.

After the war, he returned to his practice, with his son Robert joining him in 1951. Marden was appointed to the Superior Court by Governor Cross on March 3, 1953. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Reed on December 19, 1962. He retired from the Court on November 15, 1970. Marden died on September 30, 1994 at the age of 94.


Sources: In Memoriam Harold C. Marden, Maine Reporter 692-698 A.2d.





(78) Abraham M. Rudman
Associate Justice 1965-1966


001


Abraham M. Rudman was born on July 1, 1896 in Bangor to Lewis and Ida M. (Schirs) Rudman. He was educated at Bangor High School and graduated from the University of Maine School of Law in 1917. He was admitted to the Maine Bar later that same year.

Rudman maintained an active law practice in Bangor. He served in the United States Navy during World War II. In 1952, he and his son, Gerald E. Rudman, opened the Rudman law firm in Bangor. Later, another son, Paul L. Rudman, future Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court, joined the firm.

Rudman was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Cross on June 9, 1954. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Reed on March 30, 1965. He retired from the Court on December 14, 1966. Rudman died in Bangor on September 30, 1970, at the age of 74.


Sources: In Memoriam Abraham M. Rudman, Maine Reporter 293-299 A.2d; Maine, A History: Resources, Attractions and People Volume III, Harriet B. Cole. The Lewiston Historical Publishing Company Inc. Copyright 1928 NY (pg 237); Brief Biography of Maine (pg ?).





(79) Arman A. Dufresne, Jr.
Associate Justice 1965-1970; Chief Justice 1970-1977; Active Retired 1977-1985


001


Armand A. Dufresne, Jr. was born on January 17, 1909 in New Auburn, the son of French-Canadian parents Armand A. and Emilina (Couture) Dufresne. He was educated at the Seminary of St. Charles-Borromee in Sherbrooke, Quebec, and at the Montreal Seminary of Philosophy. He earned a law degree from the Boston College Law School in 1935.

Dufresne served as Assistant County Attorney (1939-1940) and County Attorney (1941-1945) for Androscoggin County. He served as Judge of the Probate Court until October 4, 1956, when he was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Muskie. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Reed on August 24, 1965. On September 30, 1970 he was appointed Chief Justice by Governor Curtis. Dufresne was the first Franco-American Chief Justice of Maine. He retired from the Court on September 3, 1977, but continued to serve as an Active Retired Justice until March 16, 1985. He died in April of 1994, at the age of 85.


Sources: In Memoriam, Armand A. Dufresne, Jr., Maine Reporter, 699-709 A.2d.





(80) Randolph A. Weatherbee
Associate Justice 1966-1976


001


Randolph A. Weatherbee was born on December 9, 1907 in Lincoln to Artemus and Helen L. (Adams) Weatherbee. He attended Lincoln public schools, Mattanawcook Academy, and Portland High School. He graduated from Bates College with a B.A. degree magna cum laude in 1932. He received a Doctor of Laws degree from Cornell University Law School in 1937. An honorary degree of Doctor of Laws was awarded at Bates College in 1962.

He served as a representative to the Legislature from 1935 to 1941; was the Penobscot County Attorney from 1941-1945; and Judge of Probate for Penobscot County from 1945-1953.

He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Cross on March 25, 1953. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Reed on December 21, 1966. He served on the Court until his death on May 20, 1976, at the age of 68.


Sources: In Memoriam, Randolph A. Weatherbee, Maine Reporter, 360-366 A.2d.





(81) Charles A. Pomeroy
Associate Justice 1969-1980


001


Charles A. Pomeroy was born on December 20, 1914 in Auburn. He received his law degree in 1936 from Columbus University Law School in Washington D.C.

After serving in the Navy during World War II, he was the United States Bankruptcy Court referee. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Muskie on October 4, 1956. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Curtis on July 2, 1969. He retired from the Court on January 1, 1980.

After he retired from the judiciary, Pomeroy served as the first chairman of Maine’s Indian Tribal-State Commission, which was created under the 1980 Maine Indian land claims settlement to oversee aspects of the settlement.

Pomeroy died on December 28, 1993, at the age of 79.


Sources: In Memoriam, Charles A. Pomeroy, Maine Reporter, 692-698 A.2d.





(82) Sidney W. Wernick
Associate Justice 1970-1981, Active Retired 1981-1995


001


Sidney W. Wernick was born on November 29, 1913 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Abraham and Sadie (Oistacher) Wernick. He attended the Philadelphia public schools and graduated from the University of Pennsylvania with a Bachelor’s degree in 1934 and a Master’s degree in 1935. He received a Doctorate degrees in 1937 from Harvard University in philosophy and mathematics. He graduated from Harvard Law School in 1940.

Wernick began his practice of law in Portland in 1940. He was a partner in the law firm of Berman, Berman, Wernick & Flaherty. He was appointed a judge of the Portland Municipal Court in 1956 by Governor Muskie and was president of the Cumberland County Bar Association in 1969.

Wernick was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Curtis on July 2, 1969. Fifteen weeks later, on September 30, 1970, he was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Curtis. He retired on August 24, 1981, and on September 14 became “of counsel” with the law firm of Preti, Flaherty & Beliveau of Portland. He served as chairman of the Maine Labor Relations Board in 1982-83. On July 11, 1984 he was appointed Active Retired Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan. In this latter capacity, Justice Wernick returned to the trial bench, hearing often-complex cases in the Superior Court. He also annually participated in the formal education of the Supreme Judicial Court’s law clerks and from 1982 to 1993 taught the course entitled “The Legal Process” at the University of Maine School of Law.

Wernick died in Portland on September 22, 1995, at the age of 81.


Sources: In Memoriam, Sidney W. Wernick, Maine Reporter, 699-709 A.2d.





(83) James P. Archibald
Associate Justice 1971-1980, Active Retired 2001-2006


001


James Putnam Archibald was born on May 17, 1912 in Houlton to Bernard and Emma (Putnam) Archibald. He graduated from Houlton High School in 1930, and Bowdoin College in 1934. He received a law degree from the Boston University School of Law in 1937.

Archibald was admitted to the Bar in 1937, and served as Aroostook County Attorney from 1942 to 1944, and from 1946 to 1950. He served as Special Assistant Attorney General for the State of Maine from 1950 to 1951, and again in 1952.

Archibald was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Muskie on October 4, 1956. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Curtis on January 27, 1971. He served in that capacity until his retirement on January 1, 1980. Archibald continued to serve as an Active Retire Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court until 2005.

Archibald was active in the Maine court system for over 49 years, longer than any other Justice in the State. In 1997, the Aroostook County Courthouse was re-dedicated in his honor by the Aroostook County Bar Association. He died on May 28, 2006.


Sources: Biography of the Hon. James Putnam Archibald.





(84) Thomas E. Delahanty
Associate Justice 1973-1979; Active Retired Justice 1979-1985


001


Thomas E. Delahanty was born on July 26, 1914 in Lewiston to Thomas and Agnes (Culbert) Delahanty. He was educated at Lewiston High School, and spent two years working in a sawmill to fund his further education. He attended George Washington University for one year on an athletic scholarship before the football program was discontinued. After finding work in the nation’s capital, Delahanty earned a law degree from the Columbus School of Law (now part of Catholic University).

Delahanty returned to practice law in Lewiston, and served as that City’s Corporate Council from 1939 until 1941. Unable to enlist during World War II due to an ulcer, he became a special agent for the Federal Bureau of Investigation. After the war, Delahanty served two terms as Assistant County Attorney, and four terms on the Lewiston City Council, the last as Council President. He was elected to the Maine House of Representatives for one term, where he was selected minority leader.

Delahanty was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Muskie on December 31, 1958. He served in that capacity until Governor Curtis appointed him an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court on September 5, 1973. Delahanty retired from the Court on August 31, 1979. He was appointed an Active Retired Justice, a position he held until his death on February 4, 1985, at the age of 70.


Sources: In Memoriam, Thomas E. Delahanty, Maine Reporter, 488-497 A.2d,





(85) Edward Settle Godfrey III
Associate Justice 1976-1983


001


Edward Settle Godfrey, III was born on July 21, 1913, in Phoenix, Arizona to Edward S. and Alma Dean (McDonald) Godfrey. He was educated at Albany Academy and graduated from Harvard College summa cum laude in 1934. In 1939, he received a law degree from the Columbia University Law School.

Godfrey served in the United States Army from 1941 until 1946, receiving the Bronze Star and attained the rank of major while serving in the Pacific. From 1948 until 1962, he taught at the Albany Law School. In 1962, he was appointed the first Dean of the revived University of Maine School of Law, a position he held until his resignation in 1973.

Godfrey was sworn in as an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Longley on September 1, 1976 and served in that capacity until his retirement on September 1, 1983. After stepping down from the bench, Godfrey taught at both the University of New Mexico and the University of Maine Law Schools. He also served as chairman of the Maine Labor Relations Board from 1984 until 1987. Godfrey died on January 12, 2005, at the age of 91.


Sources: In Celebration of Dean Emeritus Edward S. Godfrey, Maine Law Magazine, Spring 2005, pg. 2-9.





(86) David A. Nichols
Associate Justice 1977-1988


001


David A. Nichols was born on August 6, 1917 in Lincolnsville Beach to George E. and Flora E. (Pillsbury) Nichols. He was educated at Camden High School and graduated magna cum laude from Bates College in 1942. He served in Panama as part of the United States Army Air Force Weather Service during World War II. Nichols received a law degree from the University of Michigan Law School in 1949.

He served on the Executive (Governor’s) Council from 1955 until 1957, and served as Chairman of the Maine Republican State Committee from 1960 until 1964. Nichols was also the Republican National Committeeman from Maine from 1964 until 1968.

After setting up a thriving practice in Camden, Nichols was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Longley on October 1, 1975. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Longley on May 23, 1977, a position he held until his retirement on May 31, 1988. Nichols died on June 21, 1997, at the age of 79.


Sources: Kennebec Journal, June 24, 1997;Bates College (http://www.abacus.bates.edu/pubs /mags/98-winter/vital.html).





(87) Vincent L. McKusick
Chief Justice 1977-1992


001


Vincent L. McKusick was born on October 21, 1921 in Parkman to Carroll L. and Ethel (Buzzell) McKusick, the identical twin brother of Dr. Victor A. McKusick, longtime Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins Medical School. He was educated at Guilford High School and graduated from Bates College in 1943. He obtained a Master of Science degree at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and a L.L.B. degree from Harvard Law School where he was President of the Harvard Law Review (Vol. 63) from 1949 to 1950.

McKusick served in the United States Army from 1943 until 1946, spending fourteen months on the Manhattan Project at Los Alamos. From 1950 until 1951, he served as a law clerk to Judge Learned Hand of the U. S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit. He then clerked for Justice Felix Frankfurter of the U. S. Supreme Court from 1951 until 1952. McKusick was also associated with Hutchinson, Pierce, Atwood & Scribner and its successor firms (now Pierce Atwood) in Portland from 1952 to 1977.

McKusick was appointed Chief Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Longley, and served in that capacity from September 16, 1977, until February 28, 1992. Since his retirement from the Court, McKusick has served of counsel to the firm of Pierce Atwood in Portland. On three occasions he served as Special Master in Original Jurisdiction suits between states, by appointment of the United States Supreme Court.


Photo credit: Jack Montgomery from the Cleaves Law Library Collection

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Vincent L. McKusick; Pierce Atwood (http://pierceatwood.com/showbio.asp?Show=190





(88) Harry P. Glassman
Associate Justice 1979-1981


001


Harry P. Glassman was born on February 21, 1928 in New York, New York to Max and Charlotte (Silverstein) Glassman. He was raised in California and served a tour of duty in Japan after enlisting in the United States Army. He received both an undergraduate and law degree from the University of California at Berkeley.

Glassman practiced law for just under a decade in San Francisco before venturing east to the University of Virginia where he earned a Masters degree in law. In January 1962, he accepted a position as a professor of law at the University of Maine School of Law. He served as a consultant to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court Committee on Criminal Rules and authored the treatise Maine Rules of Criminal Procedure with Commentaries.

Glassman was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Curtis on January 2, 1972. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on August 3, 1979. He served on the Court until his death on May 15, 1981 at the age of 53.


Sources: In Memoriam Harry P. Glassman, Maine Reporter 441-448 A.2d.





(89) David G. Roberts
Associate Justice 1980-1998; Active Retired 1998-1999


001


David G. Roberts was born on July 17, 1928, in Fort Fairfield to Melvin P. and Ethel (Chamberlain) Roberts. He was educated at the Mount Herman School in Northfield, Massachusetts and graduated from Bowdoin College in 1950. He received a law degree from Boston University School of Law in 1956. He served in the United States Army and was stationed in both Japan and Korea.

After law school, Roberts practiced privately in Caribou from 1956 until 1961. In 1960, he ran unsuccessfully for the United States House of Representatives. From 1961 until 1967, Roberts served as Assistant United States Attorney for the District of Maine. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Curtis on March 1, 1967. In 1980, Roberts was nominated by then President Carter to replace George Mitchell as Judge of the United States District Court for the District of Maine. However, he was never confirmed and his nomination was revoked by the newly elected President Reagan.

Roberts was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on January 11, 1980. He retired from the Court on August 31, 1998, but was subsequently appointed an Active Retired Justice. Roberts died in a tragic automobile accident in Portland on January 26, 1999, at the age of 70.


Sources: Portland Press Herald, Jan. 27, 1999; Boston Globe Jan. 27, 1999.





(90) Gene Carter
Associate Justice 1980-1983


001


Gene Carter was born on November 1, 1935 in Milbridge to Kenneth W. and Loreta B. Carter. He graduated from Bangor High School in 1954 and the University of Maine at Orono in 1958. Carter received a LL.B. in 1961 from the New York University School of Law where he was the recipient of the Elihu Root-Samuel J. Tilden Scholarship.

Carter served as a law clerk for the Honorable J. Spencer Bell, Judge of the United States Court of Appeals for the Fourth District. He also served as a Captain with the Judge Advocate General’s Corps of the United States Army Reserves. Carter was admitted to the Maine Bar in February, 1962, and the Federal Bar for the District of Maine in 1964.

Carter was appointed an Associate Justice to the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on September 15, 1980. He served on the Court until July 4, 1983 when he was appointed a United States District Court Judge for the District of Maine by President Reagan. Carter became a Senior United States District Judge on January 1, 2003, and presently serves in that capacity.

Photo credit: Jack Montgomery from the Cleaves Law Library Collection

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Gene Carter.





(91) Elmer H. Violette
Associate Justice 1981-1986; Active Retired 1986-1994


001


Elmer H. Violette was born on February 2, 1921 in Van Buren to Viral and Estelle (Bosse) Violette. He was educated at the Van Buren Boys High School, earned an associate’s degree at Ricker College in Houlton and a law degree from Boston University Law School in 1939. He served in the Army Air Corps in World War II.

Violette served in the House of Representatives in 1942, and again in 1946. He was elected to the Senate in 1964 and in 1968, serving as Senate minority leader. He also was a candidate for the United States Senate in 1966, and for the United States House of Representatives in 1972. He was the first chairman of the Maine Land Use Regulation Commission.

Violette was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Curtis on September 5, 1973. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on August 31, 1981. Violette retired from the Court on August 1, 1986, but was appointed an Active Retired Justice. He resigned on February 2, 1994. Violette died in Caribou on June 18, 2000, at the age of 79.

Sources: Bangor Daily News, June 19, 2000; Kennebec Journal June 20, 2000.





(92) Daniel Wathen
Associate Justice 1981-1992;Chief Justice 1992-2001


001


Daniel E. Wathen was born on November 4, 1939 in Easton to Joseph J. and Wilda (Dow) Wathen. He was educated at Easton High School and graduated from Ricker College in 1962. In 1965, he received his law degree from the University of Maine School of Law, where he was Editor-In-Chief of the Law Review from 1963 until 1965. He was admitted to the Maine Bar in 1965. He earned a Master of Laws degree from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1988.

Wathen began his professional career in 1965 at the firm of Wathen & Wathen in Augusta. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Longley on September 16, 1977. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on August 31, 1981 and was appointed Chief Justice by Governor McKernan on March 20, 1992. He served as Chief until his retirement in 2001.

Currently, Wathen is of counsel to the firm of Pierce Atwood in Portland.

Sources: Pierce Atwood (http://www.pierceatwood.com/showbio.asp?Show=238); University of Maine, Augusta, January 3, 2003 Press Release.





(93) Caroline Duby Glassman
Associate Justice 1980-1997


001


Caroline Duby Glassman was born in Baker City, Oregon to Charles F. and Caroline Duby. Charles’ grandmother was a member of the Nez Perce Tribe whose famous Chief Joseph had unsuccessfully attempted to escape with his tribe to Canada. Caroline was educated in the public schools of Keating and Baker City, Oregon. She graduated and received an Associate degree from Eastern Oregon University, with honors in 1941 and a J.D. degree from Willamette University School of Law, summa cum laude, in 1944. She started the practice of law as a title attorney for the Salem Title Insurance Company of Salem, Oregon. From 1952 to 1960 she was an associate in the Law Offices of Melvin M. Belli in San Francisco, California. With her husband, the future Associate Justice Harry P. Glassman, and her son, Glassman moved to Maine where she resumed the practice of law in 1969.

Glassman was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on August 30, 1983. She retired on August 29, 1997.

Glassman has been President of the Cumberland Bar Association (1982), on the Board of Governors of the Maine State Bar Association (1982-83), and has received honorary degrees from the University of New England (1985), Bowdoin College (1986), Husson College (1989) and Willamette University School of Law (1994). In 1993, the Maine State Bar Association Women’s Section established the Caroline Duby Glassman Award in her honor. Following her retirement from the Court, she continues to provide leadership to the Russian American Rule of Law Commission for Maine and Archangel, Federation of Russia.

Source: Resume; “There and Now: A Perspective”; 50 Maine Law Review 405 (1998)





(94) Louis Scolnik
Associate Justice 1983-1988


001


Louis Scolnik was born on February 14, 1923 in Lewiston to Julius and Bessie (Picker) Scolnik. He was educated in the Lewiston public schools and interrupted his college education to attend the Plattsburg Midshipman School and serve in the Pacific during and after World War II. He graduated from Bates College in 1947. He received his law degree from Georgetown University Law Center in 1952. Following law school, he returned to Lewiston and practiced law with John Platz, Esq. for five years and then alone for seventeen. While an active trial lawyer he was Corporation Counsel for the City of Lewiston (1957-62); a member of the Maine Criminal Law Revision Commission (1972-74); Chairman of the Maine Advisory Committee to the United States Commission on Civil Rights; a member of the Governor’s Task Force on Human Rights; President of the Androscoggin Bar Association (1969-70); and helped organize and was the first president of the Maine Civil Liberties Union (1968).

Scolnik was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Curtis on December 10, 1974. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan on September 7, 1983. He served in that capacity until he retired on August 1, 1988.

Source: Biographical Résumé





(95) Robert W. Clifford
Associate Justice 1986-present


001


Robert W. Clifford was born on May 2, 1937 in Lewiston, Maine to William H. and Alice (Sughrue) Clifford. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1959, earned a law degree from Boston College Law School in 1962, and an LLM in Judicial Process from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1998 . Clifford served in the United States Army in Europe from 1962 until 1964, attaining the rank of Captain.

Clifford practiced law in Lewiston-Auburn at the firm of Clifford & Clifford from 1964 until 1979. During this period he also served three terms on the Lewiston Board of Aldermen, one term as its President; two terms as Mayor of Lewiston; two terms in the Maine Senate, in the 106th and 107th Legislatures; and served as the representative from the Senate to the Commission to Revise Maine’s Probate Laws, which drafted Maine’s current Probate Code. In 1978 and 1979, he served as Chairman of the Lewiston Charter Commission, which drafted Lewiston’s current city charter.

He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Brennan on June 8, 1979. He was named the State’s first Chief Justice of the Superior Court by Chief Justice Vincent L. McKusick in 1984. He served in that capacity until August 1, 1986, when he was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Brennan. Clifford has been subsequently reappointed to the Court in 1993 and 2000.

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Robert W. Clifford.





(96) D. Brock Hornby
Associate Justice 1988-1990


001


D. Brock Hornby was born on April 21, 1944 in Brandon, Manitoba, Canada to William Ralph and Retha Patricia (Fox) Hornby. He was raised in Canada, and graduated from the University of Western Ontario. He earned a law degree from Harvard Law School where he served as Supreme Court Note and Developments Editor for The Harvard Law Review (Vol. 83). He later became a naturalized United States citizen while living in Virginia.

Hornby clerked for United States Fifth Circuit Judge John Minor Wisdom from 1969 until 1970. He next became a professor at the University of Virginia School of Law, where he taught from 1970 until 1974, achieving tenure in 1973. After several years in private practice in Portland, Hornby served as Maine’s first full time United States Magistrate Judge from 1982 until 1988.

Hornby was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on June 10, 1988. He served in that capacity until May 7, 1990, when he resigned to accept an appointment by President George H.W. Bush to become the 13th federal judge for the District of Maine. From 1996 until 2003, he served as the Chief Judge of the District of Maine.

Sources: Biography of the Hon. D. Brock Hornby; United States District Court of Maine; Maine History (http://www.med.uscourts.gov/history/Court History.pdf); Judges of the United States (http://www.fjc.gov/servlet/tGetInfo?jid=1095).





(97) Samuel W. Collins, Jr.
Associate Justice 1988-1994; Active Retired 1994 to Present


001


Samuel W. Collins, Jr., was born on September 17, 1923 in Caribou to Samuel W. and Elizabeth (Black) Collins. He was educated in the Caribou schools and graduated from the University of Maine. He earned his law degree from Harvard. Following law school, Collins settled in Rockland.

He was elected to the Maine Senate five times, the first in 1974. He was elected Majority Leader in 1980 and Minority Leader in 1982. He chose not to run for a sixth term.

Collins was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on September 16, 1988. He served until his resignation on April 15, 1994. Collins continues to serve as an Active Retired Justice having been appointed by Governor McKernan on May 12, 1994 and by Governor King in 2001.





(98) Morton A. Brody
Associate Justice 1990-1991


001



Morton A. Brody was born on June 12, 1933 in Auburn to Henry and Pearl Brody. He was a graduate of Edward Little High School and Bates College. In 1958, he received a law degree from the University of Chicago Law School. Although Brody began his legal career in private practice in Washington, D.C., he returned to Waterville in 1961 to join the firm of Levine, Brody and Levine.

Brody was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Brennan on July 18, 1980 and was appointed its Chief Justice by Chief Justice Vincent L. McKusick on August 1, 1986. He served in that capacity until he was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on June 6, 1990. He resigned shortly thereafter on August 8, 1991 after having been appointed to the United States District Court by President George H.W. Bush.

During his career, Brody served as City Solicitor in Waterville, and was named the city’s distinguished citizen of the year in 1981. He was a former Chairman of the National Committee on Jury Standards and served on the First Circuit’s Gender, Race, and Ethnic Bias task force. He died on March 25, 2000, at the age of 66.

Sources: Nancy Garland, The Bangor Daily News, March 27, 2000; The Sun-Journal, March 27, 2000; The Boston Globe.





(99) Paul L. Rudman
Associate Justice 1992-2005


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Paul L. Rudman born on March 26, 1935 in Bangor to the later-to-be Supreme Judicial Court Justice Abraham M. Rudman and Irene (Epstein) Rudman. He was educated at Phillips Exeter Academy and graduated from Yale College. He earned a law degree from the George Washington University School of Law.

Rudman was a partner of the Bangor law firm of Rudman & Winchell, with whom he practiced from 1960 until 1992. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on June 5, 1992. He retired from the Court on July 1, 2005.

Currently Rudman is of counsel to the firm of Rudman & Winchell in Bangor.

Sources: Biography of the Honorable Paul L. Rudman.





(100) Howard H. Dana, Jr.
Associate Justice 1993-2007


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Howard H. Dana, Jr. was born on September 28, 1940 in Portland to Howard H. and Ann (Clifford) Dana. He graduated from Bowdoin College in 1962, earned a law degree and a Master of Public Administration degree from Cornell University in 1966, and received a Master of Judicial Process degree from the University of Virginia in 1998.

Dana began his legal career by clerking for United States District Court Judge Edward T. Gignoux in Portland. From 1967 until 1993, he practiced law at the firm of Verrill & Dana in Portland, primarily in the field of corporate litigation. He was twice elected to the Cape Elizabeth School Board and served as its chair in 1980. He was appointed by Presidents Reagan and Bush to serve on the Board of Directors of the Legal Services Corporation.

Dana was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on March 4, 1993. He serves as the Court’s liaison to the Lawyers’ Fund for Client Protection and served as chair of the Court Alternative Dispute Resolution Committee (1993-2005).

Dana represented the lawyers of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, and Rhode Island on the American Bar Association’s Board of Governors (2002-2005) and chaired the ABA Task Force on Access to Justice (2005-2006). Before his retirement he served as the vice-chair of the Justice Action Group. Dana retired from the Court on March 3, 2007.

Photo credit: Jack Montgomery

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Howard H. Dana, Jr.





(101) Kermit V. Lipez
Associate Justice 1994-1998


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Kermit V. Lipez was born on August 18, 1941 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania to Abraham H. and Beatrice (Mayerson) Lipez. He received his undergraduate degree at Haverford College in 1963, graduated form Yale Law School in 1967 and received a Master of Laws in Judicial Process from the University of Virginia School of Law in 1990.

Lipez began his career as a staff attorney for the Civil Rights Division of the United States Department of Justice Honor Program in 1967. He served as special assistant and legal counsel to Governor Kenneth M. Curtis from 1968 until 1971 and served as a legislative aide to United States Senator Edmund S. Muskie in 1972.

From 1973 until 1985 Lipez maintained a private law practice in Portland. He was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor Brennan on June 14, 1985. He was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor McKernan on May 12, 1994. Lipez resigned on June 30, 1998, to accept an appointment to the United States Court of Appeals for the First Circuit by President William J. Clinton.

Photo credit: Jack Montgomery from the Cleaves Law Library Collection

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Kermit V. Lipez; United States District Court of Maine; Maine History (http://www.med.uscourts.gov/history/Court History.pdf); Judges of the United States (http://www.fjc.gov/servlet/tGetInfo?jid=2764).





(102) Leigh I. Saufley
Associate Justice 1997-2001; Chief Justice 2001 to present


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Leigh I. Saufley was born in Portland to Richard and Janet Ingalls. She was educated at South Portland High School and graduated from the University of Maine at Orono in 1976, Phi Beta Kappa. She earned a law degree from the University of Maine School of Law in 1980.

After a brief period of private practice, she joined the State’s Attorney General’s Office in 1981, ultimately accepting an appointment as Deputy Attorney General. In April of 1990, she was appointed a Judge of the District Court by Governor McKernan. Saufley was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor McKernan on April 9, 1993.

Saufley was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor King on October 10, 1997 and was appointed Chief Justice of the Court by Governor King on December 6, 2001. Saufley is the first woman and the youngest member of the Court to be appointed Chief Justice.

Photo credit: Jack Montgomery

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Leigh I. Saufley.





(103) Donald G. Alexander
Associate Justice 1998 to present


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Donald G. Alexander was appointed to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court in 1998 by Governor Angus S. King. He previously served on the Maine Superior Court and the Maine District Court and as a Deputy Attorney General for the State of Maine. He served in Washington, D.C. as an assistant to Maine Senator Edmund S. Muskie and as Legislative Counsel for the National League of Cities. Justice Alexander is a graduate of Bowdoin College and the University of Chicago Law School. He is the author of The Maine Jury Instruction Manual (4th. ed. 2008); and Maine Appellate Practice (3rd. ed. 2008), and a principal editor of The Maine Rules of Civil Procedure with Advisory Committee Notes and Practice Commentary (2008).

He has been an adjunct faculty member at the University of Maine School of Law and has been on the faculty of the Harvard Law School Trial Advocacy Workshop since 1980. He is the Court’s liaison to the Advisory Committees on the Maine Rules of Civil Procedure and Probate Procedure, the State Court Library Committee, and the Maine State Bar Association Continuing Legal Education Committee.

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Donald G. Alexander





(104) Susan Calkins
Associate Justice 1998 to 2007


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Susan Calkins was born in Longmont, Colorado on December 15, 1942, to James and Martha Williamson. She received her undergraduate degree from the University of Colorado, attended the University of Colorado School of Law and is a graduate of the University of Maine School of Law. She received a Master of Laws degree from the University of Virginia School of Law.

Calkins practiced law with Pine Tree Legal Assistance and is the former Executive Director of the organization. She was appointed a District Court Judge by Governor Brennan on August 22, 1980 and was appointed Chief Judge of the District Court by Chief Justice McKusick on October 31, 1990. She was appointed a Justice of the Superior Court by Governor King on May 31, 1995 and was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor King on September 2, 1998.

Calkins was the Court’s liaison to the Board of Bar Examiners, the Judicial Ethics Committee and the Advisory Committee on the Rule of Evidence. She was a member of the American Bar Association’s Judges’ Advisory Committee on Ethics and Professional Responsibility and is a member of the ABA IOLTA Commission.

Photo credit: Jack Montgomery

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Susan Calkins.





(105) Jon D. Levy
Associate Justice 2002 to present


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Jon D. Levy was born on March 18, 1954 in Queens, New York to Albert and Ruth Levy. He graduated from Syracuse University and earned a law degree from the West Virginia University College of Law. Following law school, he served as a clerk for United States District Court Judge John T. Copenhaver, Jr. in Charleston, West Virginia. United States District Court Judge William W. Justice appointed him to the position of court monitor in the Texas prison conditions class action suit, Ruiz v. Estelle.

After practicing law in York for thirteen years, he was appointed a District Court Judge for District Ten by Governor King on July 13, 1995. He was appointed Deputy Chief Judge and Chief Judge of the District Court by Chief Justice Wathen. Levy was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor King on March 7, 2002.

From 1996 until 2000, Levy served as the chairperson of the Maine Family Law Advisory Commission. He is author of the book Maine Family Law, first published in 1988. He serves as the Court’s liaison to the Advisory Committee on Professional Responsibility, the Committee on Judicial Responsibility and Disability, the Committee on Media and the Courts, and the CASA Advisory Board.

Sources: Biography of the Hon. Jon D. Levy





(106) Warren M. Silver
Associate Justice 2002 to present


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Warren M. Silver was born on February 4, 1948 in Presque Isle to Alex and Edith (Bernstein) Silver. He graduated from Presque Isle High School and Tufts University in 1970 and the Washington College of Law at American University in 1973.

Following law school, Silver worked in the General Counsel’s Office of the United States Department of Health, Education and Welfare and in the General Counsel’s Office of the Election Authority of the District of Columbia. He opened his private practice in Bangor in 1977. In addition to an active trial practice, Silver served on the Board of Governors and as President of the Maine Trial Lawyers Association and as Chairman of the Court’s Civil Rules Committee and the Governor’s Judicial Selection Committee.

On July 29, 2005 Silver was appointed an Associate Justice of the Supreme Judicial Court by Governor Baldacci.

Source: Biographical Résumé





(107) Andrew M. Mead
Associate Justice 2007 to present


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Andrew M. Mead attended the University of Maine and New York Law School. He has been a member of the Bangor law firms of Paine, Lynch & Weatherbee and Mitchell & Stearns. He is a past President of the Maine State Bar Association. He was appointed to the Maine District Court in 1990 and the Maine Superior Court in 1992. He served as Chief Justice of the Maine Superior Court from 1999 to 2001. He was appointed to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court in 2007.

He has served as judicial liaison to the Maine Rules of Evidence Advisory Committee, the Court Alternative Dispute Resolution Service, the Court Technology Committee, and the Court Appointed Special Advocate Program. He has chaired the Task Force on Electronic Court Records. He currently serves as chair of the Judicial Education Committee, TECRA Implementation Group, and the JAG Collaboration project. He has been active in a number of court technology and jury reform initiatives. He is a former member of the University of Maine adjunct faculty.

Source: Biographical Résumé





(108) Ellen A. Gorman
Associate Justice 2007 to present


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Ellen A. Gorman is a 1977 graduate of Trinity College, Washington, D.C., and a 1982 graduate of the Cornell Law School. Justice Gorman practiced law as an associate with the firm of Richardson, Tyler and Troubh from 1982 until she was appointed to the Worker’s Compensation Commission by then-Governor Brennan in 1986.

In 1989 then-Governor McKernan appointed her to the Maine District Court, where she worked for eleven years. In 2000, then-Governor King appointed her to the Maine Superior Court, and she served as a Justice on that court until Governor Baldacci appointed her to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court on October 1, 2007.

Photo credit: Thomas Platz

Source: Biographical Résumé





(109) Joseph M. Jabar
Associate Justice 2009 to present


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Associate Justice Joseph M. Jabar is a graduate of Colby College and the University of Maine School of Law. Following graduation Justice Jabar served as a federal prosecutor for the Justice Department in Washington, DC. He returned to Maine and served four years as District Attorney for Kennebec-Somerset Counties. For twenty-five years he was a member of the law firm of Jabar, Batten, Ringer and Murphy of Waterville.

During these years he served two Governors as Chair of the Executive Clemency Board, served as a Workers' Compensation Commissioner, and served two terms as a State Representative. He was Chairman of the Juvenile Code Revision Commission in 1977 and 1978. He has also served on the Board of Governors for the Maine Trial Lawyers Association.

He was appointed to the Superior Court in 2001 by Governor Angus King, and he was re-appointed by Governor John Baldacci in 2008. While on the Superior Court he served on the Family Law Advisory Commission, Criminal Law Advisory Commission, Media and the Courts Committee, and the State Sentencing and Corrections Council. He was appointed to the Maine Supreme Judicial Court by Governor John Baldacci on September 1, 2009.

Photo credit: Kevin Brusie

Source: Online biography







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